10 Healthy Habits to Start (Only 20 minutes!)

10 Habits to Improve Health

10 healthy habits to improve health

Creating a healthier life, diet, mindset or relationship can feel very motivating this time of year – and also a little overwhelming.

But a healthier you can happen now with just the slightest shifts in behavior.

Master of transformation Tony Robbins teaches something called the 2-millimeter rule. It’s the idea that an ultra-slight, 2mm change in behavior can yield drastic results.

We took that approach and applied it to healthy habits. How can we continually shift our health: body, mind, and spirit just 20 minutes at a time?

Here’s what we came up with…

Practice Gratitude

Studies show that practicing gratitude can actually improve your physical and psychological health. By feeling grateful and appreciative, you can alleviate stress, reduce toxins in the body, and improve sleep and overall feeling of well-being.

Guess what? You can feel grateful and appreciative about ANYTHING. It can be about something in the past, something you are currently experiencing, or even something you desire to happen.

In fact, the brain does not know the difference between reality or imagination.

Director of Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Laboratory at CU Boulder, Tor Wager said, ”Imagination is a neurological reality that can impact our brains and bodies in ways that matter for our wellbeing,”

This means you can reap the benefits of practicing gratitude, even by dreaming up something that hasn’t happened yet!

And the best part. You can do it any time, anywhere. 

Although it may not take 20 minutes to feel grateful, we encourage you to take the time so it truly becomes a practice. 

Spending 20 minutes a day on gratitude and  is easy

Practice Gratitude

Take a Walk

Move your body by doing what it’s made to do – walk!

It’s probably no surprise to you that walking is good for your health. You simply feel better when you can be up and about, moving around.

Harvard Health shared research that outlined some enlightening benefits to walking:

  • Supports weight maintenance and helps prevent weight gain
  • Can help reduce sugar cravings
  • Reduces joint pain 
  • Lowers risk of breast cancer
  • Boosts immunity

You’ll want to be consistently strength training for exercise but walking serves as an excellent activity to do on rest days.

 

Bodies in motion, stay in motion. Take a break from the computer today and replace it with a 20-minute stroll.

Grounding to Recharge

Grounding, also known as earthing, is a direct contact between the earth and skin to “recharge” or heal the body. Most commonly, grounding is done by simply placing your bare hands or feet on natural ground.

Grounding “enables free electrons from the Earth’s surface to spread over and into the body, where they can have antioxidant effects.” (NCBI)

Research shows grounding can help improve sleep, reduce stress, heal wounds faster, and more!  

“Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay Packers Quarterback added Earthing to his optimized wellness and fitness routine aimed at extending his active playing days and overall health.”

— Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

We encourage you to take 20 minutes and get your grounding on outside but here’s a cheat for those who are stuck inside all day…

You can find tools such as grounding mats that simulate the experience of grounding so you can get the benefits of this electro-recharge while working at your desk.

Sun Exposure

Getting regular exposure to a little sunshine helps your body absorb Vitamin D, an important vitamin that isn’t found in a lot of foods.

Why do we need vitamin D?


By getting enough Vitamin D, we keep our bones, muscles, and teeth healthy and strong, and help prevent deficiencies and diseases like Osteoporosis.

Weather not cooperating? Sun lamps can be a great alternative for those who don’t live in sunny climates or want to bring the sunshine inside.

Power Napping

We realize that not everyone can fall asleep like a baby on demand, but for those of you who can – it may be time to start power napping!

Research shows, “An ultra short period of only 6 min of napping is already sufficient to significantly boost declarative memory performance.” (Journal of Sleep Research)

Not only does a very quick power nap help improve memory but it also has the following positive effects on our health…

Power napping (a nap typically under 30 minutes) can:

  • Reduce overall sleepiness throughout the day
  • Improve memory
  • Improve learning
  • Boost emotional stability

Consider this your permission slip to take a little siesta this week. 20 minutes might be all you need.

Eat Slowly

Anyone else inhale their food?

Research shows that eating rapidly is linked to individuals having a higher body-mass index.

Why?

It can take up to 20 minutes (there’s that magic number again) for the “I’m Full” signal to reach the brain.

Slowing down the process of eating at meals by taking 20 minutes per meal or simply adding 5 more minutes per meal a day could be an extremely easy, yet impactful shift to help you lose weight.

Digital Detox

Email, text message, FaceTime, Zoom, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Netflix…. The list goes on.

On any given day, we are consuming hours of digital information and for many, that consists of social media platforms.

Although technology allows us to connect with others worldwide, social media usage affects everyone differently.

Some studies show too much time spent online, particularly social media can lead to addictive behaviors, self-esteem issues, narcissistic tendencies, and feelings of isolation.

While a recent Harvard article shows that social media usage can have a positive impact on mental well-being.

And it varies across different demographics, races, age and socioeconomic statuses, 

If you struggle with intentional social media use, we suggest a 20-minute digital detox each day. Put the phone down, close the laptop, turn off the news, and replace it with one of the many healthy habits we’ve outlined here.

Need help with your digital detox? Try the free Forest app It helps you stay focused and be present by setting time limits. When you don’t want to access certain platforms or websites on your digital device, it gives you incentive by planting or “killing” beautiful digital trees.

Laugh More

Do we really need to tell you to laugh more?

It feels downright GOOD to laugh and we could all use more of it. Laughter can increase dopamine and serotonin which may produce similar effects as antidepressants.

Take 20 minutes to play a game, tell some jokes, or watch some funny home videos and LAUGH a little.

Here’s a funny video we LOVE.

 

Meditate

Clear your mind, clear your energy, clear your stress.

Meditation has been shown to have significant improvements on health and aside from practicing gratitude, may be THE best 20 minutes well spent. (Outside your 20-minute, twice a week workouts, of course 😉 )

Studies have shown meditation can:

  • Prevent respiratory illness
  • Help people stop smoking
  • Reduce anxiety
  • Reduce chronic pain
  • Improve functional ability
  • Be a therapeutic option for those with illness and diseases

Meditation can take place anytime anywhere as long as you can remain distraction free.

Although tapestries and incense are welcome, they are not needed to get the benefits of this magic method.

One of our favorite meditation apps is Headspace which has several meditation options for your unique needs.

Strength Train

Exercise in general is necessary for a healthy body and mind. Safe, effective and efficient exercise is achieved with slow-motion strength training. 

Here’s 13 Reasons WHY every adult should be doing it

Slow-motion strength training. 20 minutes, twice a week. It doesn’t get any easier than that.

Take 20 minutes for these 10 healthy habits to start improving your health:

  1. Practice Gratitude
  2. Take a Walk
  3. Ground Yourself
  4. Get some sunshine
  5. Take a nap
  6. Eat slower
  7. Take a digital detox
  8. Laugh more
  9. Meditate
  10. Strength Train

Let us help you start today.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/amymorin/2014/11/23/7-scientifically-proven-benefits-of-gratitude-that-will-motivate-you-to-give-thanks-year-round/?sh=bca261e183c0

 

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/walking-your-steps-to-health

 

Oschman, James L et al. “The effects of grounding (earthing) on inflammation, the immune response, wound healing, and prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.” Journal of inflammation research vol. 8 83-96. 24 Mar. 2015, doi:10.2147/JIR.S69656

 

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/vitamin-d-101#intro

 

LAHL, O., WISPEL, C., WILLIGENS, B. and PIETROWSKY, R. (2008), An ultra short episode of sleep is sufficient to promote declarative memory performance. Journal of Sleep Research, 17: 3-10. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2869.2008.00622.x

 

Leong SL, Madden C, Gray A, Waters D, Horwath C. Faster self-reported speed of eating is related to higher body mass index in a nationwide survey of middle-aged women. J Am Diet Assoc. 2011 Aug;111(8):1192-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2011.05.012. PMID: 21802566.

 

Andreassen CS, Pallesen S, Griffiths MD. The relationship between addictive use of social media, narcissism, and self-esteem: Findings from a large national survey. Addict Behav. 2017 Jan;64:287-293. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.03.006. Epub 2016 Mar 19. PMID: 27072491.

 

https://www.google.com/url?q=https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/features/social-media-positive-mental-health/&sa=D&ust=1611007812189000&usg=AOvVaw2inMG5N7zTBxigcBblOZ6h

Cha MY, Hong HS.   Effect and Path Analysis of Laughter Therapy on Serotonin, Depression and Quality of Life in Middle-aged Women.   J Korean Acad Nurs. 2015 Apr;45(2):221-230.   https://doi.org/10.4040/jkan.2015.45.2.221



Barrett B, Hayney MS, Muller D, et al. Meditation or exercise for preventing acute respiratory infection: a randomized controlled trial. Annals of Family Medicine. 2012;10:337–346.

 

 

Carim-Todd L, Mitchell SH, Oken BS. Mind-body practices: an alternative, drug-free treatment for smoking cessation? A systematic review of the literature. Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2013;132(3):399–410.

 

Chen KW, Berger CC, Manheimer E, et al. Meditative therapies for reducing anxiety: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Depression and Anxiety. 2012;29(7):545–562.

 

Cherkin DC, Sherman KJ, Balderson BH, et al. Effect of mindfulness-based stress reduction vs cognitive behavioral therapy or usual care on back pain and functional limitations in adults with chronic low back pain: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA. 2016;315(12):1240–1249.

 

 

Gaylord SA, Palsson OS, Garland EL, et al. Mindfulness training reduces the severity of irritable bowel syndrome in women: results of a randomized controlled trial. American Journal of Gastroenterology. 2011;106(9):1678–1688.

 

 

Goyal M, Singh S, Sibinga EM, et al. Meditation programs for psychological stress and well-being: a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA Internal Medicine. 2014;174(3):357–368.

 

 

Jedel S, Hoffman A, Merriman P, et al. A randomized controlled trial of mindfulness-based stress reduction to prevent flare-up in patients with inactive ulcerative colitis. Digestion. 2014;89:142–155.

Lakhan SE, Schofield KL. Mindfulness-based therapies in the treatment of somatization disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS One. 2013;26;8(8):e71834.

Trainer coaching woman on the Lat Pulldown machine

High-Intensity Training

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5 Ways to Optimize Your Immune System

How to optimize your immune system

Optimize Your Immune System

The topic of immunity is more popular than ever. We’ve heard and seen some interesting “ways” to optimize your immune system:

  • Taking a trillion grams of vitamin C 
  • Sweat it out with a 10 mile run 
  • Eat only fruits and vegetables and avoid all chocolate and wine on Tuesdays

What!?

Okay those may not be real, but the point is there’s some wacky advice and quick fixes out there about how to improve your health and immune system.

And although it may not be easy, it’s quite simple.

Focusing on behaviors that contribute to better health will fortify your immune system over time. 

Here are 5 ways to get started:

1. Get Quality Sleep

We have so many demands on our time—jobs, family, errands—not to mention finding some time to relax and have fun. To fit everything in, we often sacrifice… Sleep. 

But sleep has an impact on our mental and physical health. It’s vital for gaining strength, preventing illness, recovering from injury, and your overall well-being.

Of course, sleep helps you feel rested each day. But while you’re sleeping, your brain and body don’t just shut down. Internal organs and processes are hard at work throughout the night.

Sleep can be POWERFUL… if we get enough of it. 

We know about the many benefits of getting good quality sleep, but what about the effects of NOT getting a good night’s rest?

Check out these side effects of sleep deficiencies:

Sleeping woman with her head on a pillow
  • Long Term Mood Disorders
  • Sickness
  • Diabetes
  • Infertility
  • Weight Gain
  • Low Libido
  • Heart Disease

Have you ever thought about if the sleep you are getting at night is quality sleep? It helps to see exactly what’s happening while you sleep.

We’ve found some great apps you can use to track and/or enhance your sleep:

Below are more tips that may help improve your sleep tonight!

One of the best ways to get better sleep is strength training. Learn more about how our Strength Training Programs can help you!

2. Eat Nutrient-Dense Foods

My parents always told me, “Veggies are your anti-disease foods because they are nutrient dense and help fight off infection and support white blood cell strength.” Start by swapping out a few processed foods from your diet with an “anti-disease” or immune boosting option. See ideas below:

3. Lower Your Stress Levels

Stress is a natural reaction to life. But having too much stress or prolonged periods of stress can wreak havoc on the body and actually increase your susceptibility of sickness.

Watch this video on stress and how it can hurt your health!

Play Video

There are countless ways to alleviate stress, just as long as we create time for them!

Below are some ways to kick stress to the curb.

  • Exercise…. We’ve got you covered there!
  • Spending time outdoors
  • Spending time with pets (puppy therapy is a real thing!)
  • Breathing exercises
  • Meditation
  • Journaling
  • Yoga
  • Prayer
  • A good night's rest
  • Taking Breaks!

One of our favorite ways to alleviate stress is the use of breath

That’s right! Breathing properly can actually reduce stress (and help you achieve a better workout!) 

Try out some of these simple everyday breath patterns you can use to melt stress away, any time of day.

We couldn’t talk about stress relief and NOT mention exercise. We all know exercise is good for us, and it does wonders to help us reduce stress levels (3).

  • Exercising releases endorphins- you can't feel bad when you're feeling good
  • Makes you feel better and empowered
  • Helps improve the quality of your sleep
  • Strength Training produces more endorphins than cardio
  • Can reduce risk of heart disease

4. Up Your Water Intake

We could chat for hours on this subject because water is so vital to your overall health and goes beyond just feeling hydrated. Drinking plenty of water helps you have a successful workout (4) as well as these health benefits:
  • Lubricate your joints and body’s systems so that everything moves & runs smoothly
  • Regulate body temperature (which can be helpful in burning more fat!)
  • Boost metabolism
  • Protect organs & tissue
  • Clear your bladder and flushes out toxins in your system
  • And so much more!!
Watch this video for a deeper dive into what water can do for you and your body and how you can get started and work your way to drinking enough water.
Play Video

5. Exercise… The RIGHT Way

You might think that exercising more is a surefire way to fight off viruses.

Actually, too much physical stress (including exercise stress) can cause the body to react in unfavorable ways. You want just the right amount of high-intensity exercise stress for optimal improvements, and no more.

If you want to get optimal results you need to place value on resting and recovering from your workouts

Studies show that consistently exercising helps increase immunity and decrease chances of getting sick.

Luckily, engaging in effective exercise does not require a big behavioral shift.

All you need is 20 minutes with the right method and the accountability of a Personal Trainer to get results.

In case you haven’t seen enough benefits already… Slow-motion strength training is proven to provide countless benefits including (5):

  1. Greater strength
  2. More endurance
  3. Additional calorie-burning lean muscle tissue
  4. Reversing age related muscle loss (sarcopenia)
  5. Increased metabolism for how many calories you burn even while you're resting
  6. Improved fat loss
  7. Stronger bones
  8. Reversing aging of muscle cells (express younger DNA in the nuclei)
  9. Improved cardiovascular fitness
  10. Improved cholesterol levels
  11. Lower blood pressure
  12. Improved low back pain
  13. Better blood sugar control
  14. Improved immune system
  15. And many more!!

So how can we optimize your immune syetem?

There are 5 behavioral changes that will help.

  • Get quality sleep
  • Eat nutrient dense foods
  • Lower stress levels
  • Drink more water
  • Slow-motion strength training

Did you know these are key ingredients for most (if not all) health and wellness goals?

Want more guidance—
Start HERE.

References:

  1. Ferris, L. T., Williams, J. S., Shen, C. L., O’Keefe, K. A., & Hale, K. B. (2005). Resistance training improves sleep quality in older adults—a pilot study. J Sports Sci Med, 4(3), 354-60.
  2. Singh, N. A., Clements, K. M., Fiatarone, M. A. (1997). Sleep, Sleep Deprivation, and Daytime Activities A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Effect of Exercise on Sleep. Sleep, 20(2), 95-101.
  3. O’Connor, P.J., Herring, M.P., & Caravalho, A. (2010). Mental health benefits of strength training in adults. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, 4: 377; pp. 377-396. DOI: 10.1177/1559827610368771
  4. J udelson, D. A., Maresh, C. M., Farrell, M. J., Yamamoto, L. M., Armstrong, L. E., Kraemer, W. J., … & Anderson, J.M. (2007). Effect of hydration state on strength, power, and resistance exercise performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 39(10), 1817.
  5. Campbell, W.,Crim, M., Young,V. and Evans,W. (1994). Increased energy requirements and  changes in body composition with resistance training in older adults. American Journal of  Clinical Nutrition, 60: 167-175. 
  6. Evans, W. and Rosenberg, I. (1992) Biomarkers, New York: Simon and Schuster. Forbes, G.  B. (1976). “The adult decline in lean body mass,” Human Biology, 48: 161-73. 
  7. Harris, K. and Holly R. (1987). Physiological response to circuit weight training in borderline  hypertensive subjects. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 19: 246-252. 
  8. Hurley, B. (1994). Does strength training improve health status? Strength and Conditioning  Journal, 16: 7-13. 
  9. Hurley, B., Hagberg, J., Goldberg, A., et al. (1988). Resistance training can reduce coronary  risk factors without altering VO2 max or percent body fat. Medicine and Science in Sports and  Exercise, 20: 150-154. 
  10. Keyes, A., Taylor, H.L. and Grande, F. (1973). “Basal Metabolism and Age of Adult Man,”  Metabolism, 22: 579-87. 
  11. Koffler, K., Menkes, A. Redmond, W. et al. (1992). Strength training accelerates  gastrointestinal transit in middle-aged and older men. Medicine and Science in Sports and  Exercise, 24: 415-419. 
  12. Menkes, A., Mazel, S., Redmond, R. et al. (1993). Strength training increases regional bone  mineral density and bone remodeling in middle-aged and older men. Journal of Applied  Physiology, 74: 2478-2484. 
  13. Risch, S., Nowell, N. Pollock, M., et al. (1993). Lumbar strengthening in chronic low back pain  patients. Spine, 18: 232-238. 
  14. Singh, N., Clements, K. and Fiatarone, M. A randomized controlled trial of progressive resistance training in depressed elders. Journal of Gerontology, 52 A (1): M 27 – M 35.
  15. Stone, M., Blessing, D., Byrd, R., et al. (1982). Physiological effects of a short term resistive  training program on middle-aged untrained men. National Strength and Conditioning  Association Journal, 4: 16-20. 
  16. Tufts University Diet and Nutrition Letter, (1994). Never too late to build up your muscle. 12:  6-7 (September). 
  17. Westcott, W. and Guy, J. (1996). A physical evolution. Sedentary adults see marked  improvements in as little as two days a week. IDEA Today, 14 (9): 58-65. 

Osteoporosis Doesn’t Just Target Older Women

are you at risk? Ostroporosis doesn't just target older women

Fitness Trainer Newport Beach CA

In recognition of World Osteoporosis Day (10/20/20) we at The Perfect Workout want to shed even more awareness on Osteoporosis, and that starts with knowing the risk factors. This sneaky disease often creeps up on the people it affects.

Check this list of common risk factors to see if you are at risk of developing Osteoporosis.

 

Gender

Osteoporosis affects Men and Women, but women (especially White or Asian) are at higher risk.

Age

Older individuals, especially women past menopause are considered high risk. Young adults can take precautions now to prevent Osteoporosis.

Weight

Thin, frail body types and underweight BMI’s can be a risk factor for having low bone density which is a contributor to fractured bones.

Hormones

Having lower estrogen levels for women, and low testosterone for men can contribute to Osteoporosis and fractures.

Family History

Osteoporosis runs in the family. If you have a family history of the disease, your risk factor increases.

Vitamins & Minerals

Getting in adequate amounts of sunlight (Vitamin D) helps absorb Calcium, a necessary building block for healthy bones. Not getting enough calcium can also lead to deficiency.

Other Diseases

Diseases such as diabetes, hyperthyroidism, digestive conditions, cancer and rheumatoid arthritis have also been linked to Osteoporosis.

Smoking & Alchohol

Excessive smoking and drinking can lead to a slew of health problems including negatively impacting bone health.

Lifestyle & Exercise

The more sedentary you are the higher the risk of muscle and bone loss which can lead to osteoporosis, falls and fractures. This is where your strength training sessions are vital. Each slow-motion strength training workout helps to battle muscle and bone deterioration and will actually help to increase both.

Millions of people’s bodies will become fragile as they get older due to Osteoporosis.

Luckily, there's an easy solution to prevent and reverse Osteoporosis and it only takes 20 minutes. 

Learn More about Osteoporosis and how The Perfect Workout:

  • uses a method designed to build bone density
  • helps clients reverse their Osteoporosis
  • helps clients get off medication and build bone density through exercise

Whether you are already battling Osteoporosis or you have decades before that feels like a serious concern, the number one thing to help prevent, improve and reverse bone density loss is strength training. 

Keep up with your workouts help spread the awareness and share this with a friend today!

The Best Kept Secret to Controlling Diabetes

The Best Kept Secret To Controlling Diabetes

Personal Training Southwest San Jose CA

“My diabetes is so under control, my Doctor doesn’t even want to see me anymore.”- Larry H.

This is every patient’s dream outcome. And if you’ve got diabetes you know that frequent trips to the doctor are pretty common.

It’s a shame more people with diabetes aren’t doing what Larry did to get his levels under control.

What’s that? You want to know what he’s been doing?

Slow-motion strength training of course 😉

What is Diabetes?

“Diabetes is a chronic (long-lasting) health condition that affects how your body turns food into energy. If you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use the insulin it makes as well as it should. When there isn’t enough insulin or cells stop responding to insulin, too much blood sugar stays in your bloodstream.” (CDC)

Who Gets Diabetes?

Just about anyone can develop diabetes, but first let’s decipher the difference between the different types. There are two main types:

  • Type I Diabetes: an autoimmune disease typically diagnosed in children and young adults. There is no prevention for this type.
  • Type II Diabetes: 90% of people with diabetes have this type. It is generally a result of unhealthy lifestyle factors such as diet and lack of exercise/activity.
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How Serious Is It?

Very serious if not controlled.

“In the United States, 88 million adults—more than 1 in 3—have prediabetes. With prediabetes, blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes” (CDC.)

The very serious thing about prediabetes and diabetes is it raises your risk for other serious issues like heart disease, kidney disease, vision loss, stroke and even loss of limbs.

Diabetes is also strongly correlated with obesity- a major cause of many health issues.

Producing a lot of insulin can lead to both diabetes and weight gain.

One solution is to decrease the need for insulin by improving insulin sensitivity… strength training.

Strength Trainer Southwest San Jose CA

How do you control it?

Fortunately, strength training improves insulin sensitivity, and therefore also decreases insulin in the blood.

Men and women between 50 and 70 years old strength trained for four months in one study [2]. They performed full body workouts three times per week, with each workout featuring 10 exercises. At the end, the trainees improved their insulin sensitivity by 21%.

A second study was similar in terms of length and age group [3], except the workout included only five exercises per session. The result was similar: a 25% improvement in insulin sensitivity. And, the trainees lost averages of 3 and 8.4 lbs of fat.

Effective strength training can help keep your insulin levels in check, helping you to manage your weight while reducing risk of diabetes.

Strength Training Southwest San Jose CA

how does strength training improve it?

People with type 2 diabetes have an abundance of glucose in their blood, an amount of blood sugar beyond what is considered a healthy level. High intensity exercise, such as strength training, is the only type of exercise that uses predominantly glucose as fuel.

One study conducted at Louisiana State University lasted nine months and the participants were men and women of various ethnicity and averaged 56 years of age. The average starting hemoglobin A1c (a measure of blood glucose over three months) was 7.7%. Six and a half percent is considered the minimum amount for type 2 diabetes.

The strength training regimen featured:

  • nine exercises targeting major muscle groups in the upper and lower body
  • each exercise was performed for one set
  • workouts were conducted twice per week


At the end of the study, the diabetic men and women experienced improvements in hemoglobin A1c ranging from 0.3 to 1.0%.

Forty-one percent of the participants improved by 0.5% or more, or were at least able to decrease their medications.

To put this into real-life perspective, a decrease in hemoglobin A1c as small as 0.3% is significant: it can translate to years of life regained.

The strength training program required a total of only 30 to 40 minutes per week, and the participants also walked approximately 100 minutes per week (an average of about 14 minutes of walking a day).

At The Perfect Workout, we know of a number of people with type 2 diabetes who improved their blood glucose with strength training and no other changes in their lifestyle.

They simply showed up for a high-intensity strength training session twice per week for about 20 minutes each visit.

That’s good news for people with diabetes looking to improve their health and extend their lives.

  • Church, T. S., Blair, S. N., Cocreham, S., Johannsen, N., Johnson, W., Kramer, K., … & Earnest, C. P. (2010). Effects of aerobic and resistance training on hemoglobin A1c levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 304(20), 2253-2262.
  • Turner, R. C., Holman, R. R., Cull, C. C., Stratton, I. M., Matthews, D. R., Frighi, V., …Hadden, C. (1998). Intensive blood-glucose control with sulphonylureas or insulin compared with conventional treatment and risk of complications in patients with type 2 diabetes (UKPDS 33). The Lancet (British Edition), 352(9131), 837.
  • Cauza, E., Hanusch-Enserer, U., Strasser, B., Ludvik, B., Metz-Schimmerl, S.,…Pacini, G. (2005). The relative benefits of endurance and strength training on the metabolic factors and muscle function of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The Archives of Physiology and Medical Rehabilitation, 86(8), 1527-1533.
  • Brooks, N., Layne, J. E., Gordon, P. L., Roubenoff, R., Nelson, M. E. Castaneda-Sceppa, C. (2007). Strength training improves muscle quality and insulin sensitivity in hispanic older adults with type 2 diabetes. International Journal of Medical Sciences, 4(1),
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High-Intensity Training

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How to Stay Mentally Sharp & Avoid Cognitive Decline

How to stay mentally sharp & avoid cognitive decline

Strength Trainer Newport Beach CA

The thought of getting cancer, getting injured from a fall or getting diagnosed with Osteoporosis are all real fears we want to avoid.

But the scariest thing to many adults is the possibility of mentally slipping.

Forgetting your family, forgetting how to do simple tasks and forgetting who you are might be one of the most terrifying side effects of aging.

Although there’s no one-size-fits-all solution there is one thing scientifically shown to decrease the chances of heading down the path of cognitive decline…

Strength Training.

A high quality life

When you look into the future you want to see a life filled with family, hobbies, adventure, and the ability to do what you want- a high quality life.

Part of having a high quality of life is possessing the mental capacity necessary to keep up with that vision of the future. For this we need to have a healthy memory, awareness, and ability to shift focus within seconds.

In terms of health, strength training is usually discussed as an effective treatment for building bone density, controlling blood sugar, and improving the cardiovascular system.

However, research over the past six years is showing that strength training is also an effective method for improving cognitive function, even in those who show signs of decline.

Fitness Trainer Newport Beach CA

Improving existing cognitive decline

Strength training has been proven to help prevent cognitive issues, as well as improve cognition in those who already are experiencing decline.

Researchers at the University of British Columbia have performed a few studies related to this. Each study included women only. The 2010 study lasted one year with the participants split into three groups:

  • Strength training once per week
  • Strength training twice per week
  • Balance activities and light resistance movements twice per week (control group)


The strength training group trained intensely, typically fatiguing to the point of “muscle success” in about six to eight repetitions.

A couple of cognitive tests were performed before and after the year of training, including:

  • The Stroop Test – a timed test seeing how quickly the participant can read the names of colors when font colors don’t match the name. This measures selective attention, cognitive flexibility, and processing speed.
  • Verbal Digit Span Test – a test requesting the subjects to repeat sequences of numbers that were told to them, providing an assessment of memory.
  • Trail Marker Tests – a series of tests that provide an assessment of several cognitive skills, including the speed at which a person can switch from one focused task to another.


At the end of the study, cognitive performance declined slightly in the control group, but improved by 11 to 13% in the strength training groups.

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Despite being an average of 70 years old, the women who performed strength training became mentally sharper over the 12-month period. In addition, peak muscle power, the key attribute allowing seniors to perform challenging daily tasks, increased by 13% in the twice-weekly strength group.

The 2012 study was a similar experiment but featured an older group of women who had mild cognitive impairment (risk factors for dementia). This study lasted six months and also had three groups:

  • a twice-weekly strength training group
  • twice- weekly aerobic exercise group
  • and a control group that performed balance and stretching movements.

The strength group improved in their Stroop Test scores, memory, and functional changes were noticed in three brain areas (via MRIs).

The effectiveness of strength training on the mind is not limited to women only. A 2007 study at the Federal University of San Paolo found two and three strength workouts per week led to similar improvements in men who averaged 68 years old.

The men in this study also experienced less anxiety, depression, confusion, and fatigue at the end of this study.

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Researchers in Australia tested the theory of resistance training having the ability to boost brain power. 68 women and 32 men between the ages of 55 and 86, all with mild cognitive impairment were observed.

They were randomly assigned to two groups. The first group did weight training twice a week for six months, lifting 80% of the maximum amount they could. The second group did stretching exercises.

“All participants were given cognitive tests at the beginning and end of the study and 12 months after they finished the study. The group that did the weight training scored significantly higher at the end of the study than at the beginning and retained that gain at 12 months. The gain in test scores was also greatest for those who had the greatest gains in strength. The scores of the group who performed stretching exercises declined somewhat.

It's not too late to strive towards improving mental health. With strength training it only takes 20 minutes, twice a week to give you or your loved ones a better chance at a high quality life.

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More research

Strength training has been shown to be a holistic solution to improving brain function and cognition in general. Here are more studies:

One study done in 2017 looked at adults at least 55 years old, and had:

  • one group doing strength training
  • another group doing some computer version of brain training (puzzles, sudoku, etc.)
  • another group doing stretching, or something that hadn't been shown to improve brain function. (control group)

After six months, strength training by itself was the most effective intervention in all the major areas, including improvements in memory and improvements in Alzheimer's disease score- which predicts the risk for developing Alzheimer's.

You would think “brain training” would have been the winner, but strength training beat it.

In one study, adults in senior living facilities were evaluated on tasks of executive functioning before and after a month-long strengthening, non-aerobic exercise program.

“A total of 16 participants who engaged in such exercise showed significantly improved scores on Digits Backward and Stroop C tasks when compared to 16 participants who were on an exercise waiting list.”

Another interesting study found that cognitive decline is associated with a severe fear of falling: a common fear amongst many older adults.

What’s an easy solution to prevention of falling as well as cognitive decline?

Slow-motion strength training!

CDC recommends it. We provide it.

According to the CDC, there are things you can do to reduce risk of getting Dementia:

  • Maintain a healthy blood pressure level
    • Slow-motion strength training has been proven to lower blood pressure and we’ve helped many clients, like John Abel, get off their blood pressure medication.
  • Manage cholesterol levels with exercise and, if needed, cholesterol medications.
  • Keep blood sugar within a healthy range.
    • Our method has helped clients reduce their A1C levels and get their Diabetes under control
    • “The Perfect Workout is reversing my diabetes and reversing my age. My wife says I don’t even look like I’m in my 50’s.”- Larry H.
  • Get to and maintain a healthy weight.
    • By adding lean muscle mass, your body naturally has the ability to burn more calories, making it easier to lose and maintain weight.
    • Read about some of our success stories here.
  • Reduce hazards in your environment that could lead to falls or head injury.
  • Exercise, including aerobic physical activity.
    • Did you know you can get all the cardiovascular benefits you need from a 20-minute strength training session? Here’s how
  • Get good quality sleep.
    • Strength training improves your ability to fall asleep quicker and quality of sleep
  • Keep your mind active and stimulated, with challenging tasks such as learning a new activity.

The solution is simple

Looking at the research above, strength training offers a unique ability to improve cognitive function in a number of ways, even when signs of decline exist. This benefit can be attained in as little as just one intense workout per week.

Considering that strength training requires minimal time, strengthens bones and muscles, improves cardiovascular health, and the ability to process, recall, and react to life’s demands, it’s hard to see why anyone wouldn’t want to participate.

Liu-Ambrose, T., Nagamatsu, L. S., Graf, P., Beattie, B. L., Ashe, M. C., & Handy, T.C. (2010). Resistance training and executive functions: a 12-month randomized controlled trial. Archives of internal medicine, 170(2), 170.

Nagamatsu, L. S., Handy, T. C., Hsu, C. L., Voss, M., & Liu-Ambrose, T. (2012). Resistance training promotes cognitive and functional brain plasticity in seniors with probable mild cognitive impairment. Archives of internal medicine, 172(8), 666-668.

Cassilhas, R. C., Viana, V. A., Grassmann, V., Santos, R. T., Santos, R. F., Tufik, S. E. R. G. I. O., & Mello, M. T. (2007). The impact of resistance exercise on the cognitive function of the elderly. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 39(8), 1401.

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Strength Training for Osteoporosis + How to Prevent

The sneaky disease that makes women fragile... And how to prevent it.

The Sneaky Disease

Fragile. It’s not how anyone wants to be described.

Yet millions of people’s bodies will become fragile as they get older, large in part to a disease called Osteoporosis.

Luckily, there is an easy solution to preventing and reversing Osteoporosis and it only takes 20 minutes.

What is osteoporosis?

The Mayo Clinic classifies Osteoporosis as a disease that “causes bones to become weak and brittle — so brittle that a fall or even mild stresses such as bending over or coughing can cause a fracture. Osteoporosis-related fractures most commonly occur in the hip, wrist or spine.

Bone is living tissue that is constantly being broken down and replaced. Osteoporosis occurs when the creation of new bone doesn't keep up with the loss of old bone.”

What is Osteoporosis

Who gets osteoporosis?

According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF), about 10 million people in the US have osteoporosis. The NOF states that individuals are most susceptible when above the age of 50, are female, have small/thin frames, have a family history of osteoporosis, and have suffered skeletal issues as adults (fractures or “shrinking” due to an increased curve of the spine).

“Osteoporosis affects men and women of all races. But white and Asian women — especially older women who are past menopause — are at highest risk. Medications, healthy diet and weight-bearing exercise can help prevent bone loss or strengthen already weak bones.” (Mayo Clinic)

Osteoporosis - Higher Risk

How serious is it?

Osteoporosis is pretty serious. In fact our own Founder’s grandmother died of complications from having the disease.

Matt Hedman’s grandmother had Osteoporosis and as she got older she started getting Kyphosis in her spine– which is when you start to get hunched over. The Kyphosis got progressively worse and worse with age.

By the time that she was in her early to mid-80s, the Kyphosis was so severe that the bones had become too soft and could not prevent the collapse of her chest cavity, greatly reducing the amount of oxygen she was able to get.

Eventually, she couldn't breathe effectively and she passed away around the age of 86.

How do you prevent it?

Weight-bearing exercise, particularly slow-motion strength training has been proven to prevent bone loss.

In fact, Slow-Motion Strength Training was originally created at the University of Florida as a solution to treat women with Osteoporosis because it was proven to help build bone density in addition to muscle and other incredible benefits.

The Perfect Workout offers an incredibly simple solution with 20-minute, twice a week training sessions.

How does strength training prevent osteoporosis?

Strength training increases bone density.

This occurs through two mechanisms.

  • First, exercises that involve multiple joints (i.e. the leg press and chest press) produce forces that cause your bones to temporarily bend slightly. The body essentially perceives the bending as a weakness and reacts by depositing more calcium in the bones.
  • The second mechanism is one that can occur with any exercise. Muscles are attached to bones via tendons. When muscles contract, they pull on the tendons, which pull on the bones to cause the desired movement. In response to strenuous muscle contraction, calcium is deposited at the part of the bone where the tendon pulls.

While seniors have osteoporosis more often, strength training can also help younger women, making it a preventative measure as well.

A total of 70 women between the ages of 18-26 trained three times per week for five months in one study.

At the end, bone density was increased in the thigh, forearm, and lower leg. An interesting aspect of this study was that only one half of the body was exercised. Despite only training one arm and one leg, bone density still improved in parts of the untrained leg! The exercise had a ripple effect that carried over to untrained areas. Imagine if these women trained their entire bodies like we do in our 20-minute sessions.

I have osteoporosis. Can it be reversed?

Yes. Although everyone’s bodies are different and react differently to the stimulus of exercise, studies show that Osteoporosis can be reversed and bone density levels can normalize through strength training.

Another study split 38 women, between the ages of 65-75, into two groups: a strength training group and a control group [1].

  • The strength training group trained three times per week using a slow lifting cadence and their routines focused on exercises using the large muscle groups (i.e. leg press, bench press, etc.).
  • The control group did not change their normal lifestyles.


After one year, the strength training group increased bone density in their hips and lumbar spine (lower back). The increase was small but consistent throughout the women.

Conversely, the control group lost bone density in their femurs, hips, and lumbar spine.

In other words, strength training reversed bone loss that would have occurred had the women continued their usual lifestyles.

However, that's not the only good news to come out of this study. As mentioned, the lower back gained bone density…even though there were no lower back exercises.

How is this possible?

The researchers said this is likely from the leg press. The hip movements of the leg press utilize the hip flexors and extenders, some of which connect to the spine. The use of these muscles put a positive force on the spine that resulted in the bone density improvement.

In this same study, no injuries were reported [1]. The strength training group participated in over 2,500 sessions and suffered ZERO injuries!

As you can see, strength training offers women, including senior women, a safe way to change nature's course and regain bone density in critical areas.

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SMST is the best medication

For many clients who have been diagnosed with Osteoporosis, they are faced with life-long medications such as Fosamax.

Rather than getting a prescription for medication, our client, Lori Grosse's wishes her physicians prescribed her slow-motion strength training.

“If they had said to me, ‘There is a group called The Perfect Workout that is designed for women with osteoporosis. It’ll only take you two times a week for 20 minutes.’ I would have said, ‘Give me the info!’”

The fact is we’ve helped many clients get off their Osteoporosis medications as a result of slow-motion strength training.

Whether you are at high risk for Osteoporosis or not, you’re losing muscle and bone each year. The only way to truly combat that is to actively strength train.

20-minutes is all you need!

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Depression & Anxiety Reduced in 20 Minutes

Depression & anxiety reduced in 20 minutes

If you feel stressed, anxious, or sad during this quarantine/COVID-19 period, you are part of the majority.

Fortunately, you have the power to improve and maintain your own mental health.

Several activities have been proven to reduce anxiety and improve overall mood. One of these is… a 20-minute strength training session! (Come on…you knew I was going to say that, right?)

The CDC recently reported that the coronavirus period is adding stress manifested in several ways, including difficulty with sleeping and/or concentration, changes in sleep patterns, fear about your own and/or others’ health, and increased alcohol or tobacco use.

Here is what we know about how strength training can help your mental health:

  1. For people with existing health issues, a strength training program reduces depressive symptoms and improves overall mood (1).
  2. Strength training decreases the severity of depression for those with diagnosed depression (1,2).
  3. As little as eight weeks of strength training works for reducing depression (2).
  4. Training two or three times per week is shown to reduce depression (1,2).
  5. A decrease in anxiety and improvement in overall mood can be seen as quickly as five minutes after the workout is over (3).
  6. A single strength training workout can significantly decrease anxiety (3,4).

A few weeks of strength training, at least twice per week, can reduce depression. A single strength training session can elevate your mood and greatly improve your anxiety level.

More importantly, please remember to take care of yourself. Your physical and mental health are worth investing time in, especially now.

Strength train AND take part in other activities that reduce your stress and add happiness: connect with your family, spend time outdoors, create time for your favorite hobbies, and aim to regularly get enough sleep. This is a stressful time, but remember that you have the power to control your stress level.

  1. Brosse, A.L., Sheets, E.S., Lett, H.S., & Blumenthal, J.A. (2002). Exercise and the treatment of clinical depression in adults: recent findings and future directions. Sports Medicine, 32(12), 741-760.
  2. Stanton, R., Reaburn, P., & Happell, B. (2013). Is cardiovascular or resistance exercise better to treat patients with depression? A narrative review. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 34, 531-538.
  3. Bibeau, W.S., Moore, J.B., Mitchell, N.G., Vargas-Tonsing, T., & Bartholomew, J.B. (2010). Effects of acute resistance training of different intensities and rest periods on anxiety and affect. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 24(8), 2184-2191.
  4. Broman-Fulks, J.J., Kelso, K., & Zawilinski, L. (2015). Effects of a single bout of aerobic exercise versus resistance training on cognitive vulnerabilities for anxiety disorders. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy.
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Reducing Sports Injury Risk

reducing sports injury risk

According to the National Federation of State High School Associations, football participation in California and Texas has increased steadily for years…until the last two years. Football participation is decreasing in many states over the last two years. This is hardly a surprise. The last few years have also featured numerous stories about NFL players suffering torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL), concussions, and there was a lawsuit where former NFL players sued the league over inadequate warning for concussion risk.

In the 2011-2012 school year, there were nearly 1.4 million estimated sports-related injuries in high schools across the United States (according to the National High School-Related Sports Injury Surveillance Study). While football led the way, sports such as soccer, basketball, and wrestling also produce tens of thousands of injuries per year. How do we protect our kids from athletic injuries? How can we make sports safer?

In addition to looking at changes within the sports themselves, we can also properly prepare the participants. Strength training has demonstrated a clear ability to reduce injury risk for young athletes in research. A review of research from the Journal of Sports Medicine mentioned seven studies with high school athletes that found that a strength training program reduced injury rates in various sports. This is likely due to several reasons. As a bonus, strength training is relatively safe for kids and poses little injury risk itself.

Athletic injuries occur when the force placed on the body exceeds the force our bones, muscles, tendons, and ligaments can withstand. In sports, these forces are often uncontrollable…especially with young athletes. An athlete can safely and effectively move around the field or court, but that still doesn’t stop another player from accidentally crashing into the athlete or misplacing a foot under an athlete as he or she is landing from a jump. Of course, collision isn’t always necessary. For example, even just running can lead to a strained hamstring or front thigh muscle.

Strength training prepares the athletic body to sustain many of these forces. Strength training increases bone strength as well as connective tissue strength, which reduces the risk of bone fractures or tears in tendons or ligaments. Strength training increases muscle size and strength. As an athlete becomes stronger, his or her muscles support more force, which helps during common movements such as jumping and running. In fact, long distance runners are known to adopt strength training to reduce lower body injuries.

The Journal of Sports Medicine review also mentioned strength training as a safe option for young athletes. According to one study, strength training with 13-16-year old boys led to just 3.5 injuries for every 10,000 hours of participation. Another study said strength training was responsible for less than one percent of high school sports injuries each year. From the results of seven studies, the researchers stated, “injury occurrence (with resistance training) in children and adolescents was either very low or nil.”

Strength training physically develops muscles, bones, and connective tissues. As a result of strength training, these various tissues are more able to withstand the various forces on the body that are experienced with athletics. As a bonus, strength training is comparatively very safe. Injury risk is extremely low in general and when compared to other sports. At this point, I imagine the only question parents have about strength training with their youngsters is, “What are we waiting for?!”

  1. Faigenbaum, A. D., & Myer, G. D. (2010). Resistance training among young athletes: safety, efficacy and injury prevention effects. British journal of sports medicine, 44(1), 56-63.
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Knee Replacement “Prehabilitation”

knee replacement "prehabilitation"

Let me tell you about Lilly. Lilly is 81 years old and holds a position on the board of a large hospital. She routinely works 10-hour days, five days per week, which includes giving lectures and running board meetings. Due to all of her work, Lilly is on her feet for hours per day.

This is not only impressive when considering Lilly’s age, but also because she had a total knee replacement (TKR) six months ago. Despite the close proximity to her surgery, Lilly has no knee pain, caregiver, or gait issues. How? Lilly attributes her quick recovery to the strength she built during three months of “prehabilitation,” where she strength trained twice per week prior to her surgery.

Lilly is not a fluke. A 2009 study at

the University of Louisville demonstrated that strength training prior to a TKR led to greater improvements in strength of the operated leg, standing from a chair, and with walking up and down stairs [1]. In addition, quadriceps strength prior to surgery is associated with greater dynamic balance a year after surgery [2].

TKRs are as popular as ever. More than 381,000 TKRs take place every year, and researchers expect that number to grow six-fold in the next 20 years [1]. The surgery can be very helpful as it enables people with severe knee osteoarthritis to decrease or eliminate their pain while improving their functional ability.

However, a TKR also leads to a period of inactivity during recovery, and that inactivity has drawbacks. People lose about 60% of their quadriceps strength within the first month following surgery. Considering that information, it’s no surprise that people with TKRs have demonstrated slower walking and stair-climbing speeds when compared to their peers.

Researchers at the University of Louisville conducted a study comparing people who “prehabbed” against those who did not (control group) for the five months prior to surgery. Like Lilly, the individuals who strength trained fared very well. Before the surgery, strength training prevented knee pain from increasing and improved the participants’ functional abilities (getting up from a chair, walking speed, and stair-climbing speed).

One month after the surgery, the control group experienced losses in quadriceps strength and walking speed, whereas the exercise group did not (when compared to baseline tests). Three months later, functional ability and strength in the operated leg were greater in the exercise group.

The exercise group trained three times per week prior to the surgery, including exercises such as the leg curl and leg extension. Following the surgery, both groups received the same physical therapy.

Overall, the study found quadriceps strength was associated with greater functional ability and less knee pain. Researchers in a study out of the University of Delaware found the same connections when monitoring quadriceps strength days before and one year after a TKR [2]. They also noticed that quadriceps strength before surgery also predicts dynamic balance a year after surgery. Dynamic balance is tested by seeing how quickly a person can stand from a chair, walk around a sharp turn, and then return to the chair.

If a TKR is in your future, you might wonder how long you should train for prior to the procedure. As mentioned, the study included five months of prehabilitation, although Lilly trained for only three. Obviously, the earlier you start, the more strength you will build prior to surgery.

As a whole, the studies and Lilly’s experience make sense: joints are healthier when their surrounding muscles are stronger. Strength training before a TKR allows you the opportunity to build healthier joints and muscles that you will simply work to maintain after surgery, instead of having to build them for the first time.

  1. Topp, R., Swank, A. M., Quesada, P. M., Nyland, J., & Malkani, A. (2009). The effect of prehabilitation exercise on strength and functioning after total knee arthroplasty. PM&R, 1(8), 729-735.
  2. Mizner, R. L., Petterson, S. C., Stevens, J. E., Axe, M. J., & Snyder-Mackler, L. (2005). Preoperative quadriceps strength predicts functional ability one year after total knee arthroplasty. The Journal of rheumatology, 32(8), 1533-1539.
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The Influence of Somatypes

The Influence of Somatypes

I know a guy who eats whatever he wants and never gains a pound. His body looks similar and weighs about the same as it did in high school. At no time in his life has he ever been referred to as overweight, and he probably never will be.

When he consistently strength trains, he gains about six to eight pounds of lean tissue. His muscle growth is noticeable but won’t blow you away. People have often told him that he should eat more and that he’s too skinny. He has less body fat and muscle than most, but some of that is due to factors not under his control.

When it comes to our ability to gain fat or muscle, the truth is we aren’t on an even playing field. Anyone starting an effective strength training program will gain some muscle tissue, but the amount of muscle we can gain is largely determined by our genetics. One of those genetic factors is our somatype.

A somatype is a classification for body types. These classifications are based on amounts of fat and muscle cells. Our fat and muscle cell quantities are important because they rarely change much during adulthood. Past the age of 18, people likely do not lose fat cells, and may gain more of them in extreme cases. On the other hand, we can lose muscle cells with age if we’re not strength training, but gaining them is uncommon.

To put it simply, our muscle and fat cell totals help to determine our maximum potential for change. Within those limits, the changes we see are just increases or decreases in cell size.

There are four basic somatypes:

  • Ectomorph – few fat and muscle cells
  • Mesomorph – few fat cells with many muscle cells
  • Endomorph – few muscle cells with many fat cells
  • Meso-Endomorph – many fat and muscle cells

The guy who I discussed in the opening example is an ectomorph. As mentioned, he does gain muscle when sticking with strength training, but he will never look like a bodybuilder or anything close to it.

For mesomorphs, strength training produces a greater gain in muscle for them than it does with ectomorphs. Mesomorphs also tend to have more fat than ectomorphs. They are the people who generally can gain or lose 20 pounds with diet and strength training.

Endomorphs won’t grow a lot of muscle with strength training, whereas meso-endomorphs do. Meso-endomorphs have the most muscle mass of anyone who fits into one somatype. Examples of meso-endomorphs are linemen in football and World’s Strongest Man competitors.

The importance of knowing that somatypes exist can be helpful in a number of ways. For example, knowing about somatypes is further support for the idea that you should only compare you to yourself and not to others (who may have a different somatype than you).

The potential your somatype provides is irrelevant without consistently training as hard as you can. You can only learn where your ceiling is by working towards it. Also, no matter what your genetics indicate for your physique, keep in mind that your actions (i.e. how you eat and exercise) are the biggest factors in improving your health and well-being.

Training at The Perfect Workout will help you achieve your ideal physique, and by increasing the amount of muscle tissue that you’re able to add, you will become healthier and feel better.