The Safety of Slow Motion Strength Training

Mission Monday Episode 2

Does the risk of a potential injury make you hesitant to exercise? If your answer is “Yes,” this video is for you.

Slow-motion strength training, especially at The Perfect Workout, is EXTREMELY safe. Keep reading to learn why…

Why Exercise Injuries Happen

An Australian research team studied injuries that took place in fitness facilities over a 14 year period. They identified nearly 3,000 injuries during that time.

Here’s the story behind those injuries:

  • 55% of injuries took place during free weight exercises
  • The rest of the injuries mainly occurred during group exercise classes, while using the treadmill, boxing, or during a jumping exercise

All of these activities have something in common: they are NOT a part of slow-motion strength training. Slow training omits these higher-risk activities.

To understand another reason why it’s so safe, let’s go back to high school physics. Injuries commonly occur during exercise when an excess of force is placed on bones, tendons, and ligaments.

When the force during an exercise is more than these different structures can handle, it can lead to a fracture, tear, strain, or sprain.

What is Force?

Newton’s Second Law of Motion states that Force is equal to Mass x Acceleration. This means, if the force of an exercise is too great, that’s because it has an excess of mass or acceleration. Slow-motion strength training limits force by limiting the acceleration.

As you perform an exercise, you are moving at a constant speed — there’s no rapid acceleration at any point. As a result, only a safe amount of force is placed on the bones and connective tissues.

There’s one more reason why slow-motion strength training is so safe. The slow speed enables your personal trainer to have more time to correct form errors. With a slow repetition, a trainer can catch and correct a form error within the same repetition.

Slow-Motion Strength Training is Safe

As a whole, slow-motion training excludes the activities that cause exercise-related injuries, limits the force placed on joints, and provides plenty of time for the trainer to correct form errors.

Slow-motion strength training is an extremely safe and effective way to improve your health, physique, and physical abilities.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Gray, S.E. & Finch, C.F. (2015). The causes of injuries sustained at fitness facilities presenting to Victorian emergency departments – identifying the main culprits. Injury Epidemiology, 2(1), 6.

The Safety of Slow Motion Strength Training

Mission Monday Episode 2

Does the risk of a potential injury make you hesitant to exercise? If your answer is “Yes,” this video is for you.

Slow-motion strength training, especially at The Perfect Workout, is EXTREMELY safe. Keep reading to learn why…

Why Exercise Injuries Happen

An Australian research team studied injuries that took place in fitness facilities over a 14 year period. They identified nearly 3,000 injuries during that time.

Here’s the story behind those injuries:

  • 55% of injuries took place during free weight exercises
  • The rest of the injuries mainly occurred during group exercise classes, while using the treadmill, boxing, or during a jumping exercise

All of these activities have something in common: they are NOT a part of slow-motion strength training. Slow training omits these higher-risk activities.

To understand another reason why it’s so safe, let’s go back to high school physics. Injuries commonly occur during exercise when an excess of force is placed on bones, tendons, and ligaments.

When the force during an exercise is more than these different structures can handle, it can lead to a fracture, tear, strain, or sprain.

What is Force?

Newton’s Second Law of Motion states that Force is equal to Mass x Acceleration. This means, if the force of an exercise is too great, that’s because it has an excess of mass or acceleration. Slow-motion strength training limits force by limiting the acceleration.

As you perform an exercise, you are moving at a constant speed — there’s no rapid acceleration at any point. As a result, only a safe amount of force is placed on the bones and connective tissues.

There’s one more reason why slow-motion strength training is so safe. The slow speed enables your personal trainer to have more time to correct form errors. With a slow repetition, a trainer can catch and correct a form error within the same repetition.

Slow-Motion Strength Training is Safe

As a whole, slow-motion training excludes the activities that cause exercise-related injuries, limits the force placed on joints, and provides plenty of time for the trainer to correct form errors.

Slow-motion strength training is an extremely safe and effective way to improve your health, physique, and physical abilities.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Gray, S.E. & Finch, C.F. (2015). The causes of injuries sustained at fitness facilities presenting to Victorian emergency departments – identifying the main culprits. Injury Epidemiology, 2(1), 6.

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