How to Stay Mentally Sharp & Avoid Cognitive Decline

How to stay mentally sharp & avoid cognitive decline

Strength Trainer Newport Beach CA

The thought of getting cancer, getting injured from a fall or getting diagnosed with Osteoporosis are all real fears we want to avoid.

But the scariest thing to many adults is the possibility of mentally slipping.

Forgetting your family, forgetting how to do simple tasks and forgetting who you are might be one of the most terrifying side effects of aging.

Although there’s no one-size-fits-all solution there is one thing scientifically shown to decrease the chances of heading down the path of cognitive decline…

Strength Training.

A high quality life

When you look into the future you want to see a life filled with family, hobbies, adventure, and the ability to do what you want- a high quality life.

Part of having a high quality of life is possessing the mental capacity necessary to keep up with that vision of the future. For this we need to have a healthy memory, awareness, and ability to shift focus within seconds.

In terms of health, strength training is usually discussed as an effective treatment for building bone density, controlling blood sugar, and improving the cardiovascular system.

However, research over the past six years is showing that strength training is also an effective method for improving cognitive function, even in those who show signs of decline.

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Improving existing cognitive decline

Strength training has been proven to help prevent cognitive issues, as well as improve cognition in those who already are experiencing decline.

Researchers at the University of British Columbia have performed a few studies related to this. Each study included women only. The 2010 study lasted one year with the participants split into three groups:

  • Strength training once per week
  • Strength training twice per week
  • Balance activities and light resistance movements twice per week (control group)


The strength training group trained intensely, typically fatiguing to the point of “muscle success” in about six to eight repetitions.

A couple of cognitive tests were performed before and after the year of training, including:

  • The Stroop Test – a timed test seeing how quickly the participant can read the names of colors when font colors don’t match the name. This measures selective attention, cognitive flexibility, and processing speed.
  • Verbal Digit Span Test – a test requesting the subjects to repeat sequences of numbers that were told to them, providing an assessment of memory.
  • Trail Marker Tests – a series of tests that provide an assessment of several cognitive skills, including the speed at which a person can switch from one focused task to another.


At the end of the study, cognitive performance declined slightly in the control group, but improved by 11 to 13% in the strength training groups.

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Despite being an average of 70 years old, the women who performed strength training became mentally sharper over the 12-month period. In addition, peak muscle power, the key attribute allowing seniors to perform challenging daily tasks, increased by 13% in the twice-weekly strength group.

The 2012 study was a similar experiment but featured an older group of women who had mild cognitive impairment (risk factors for dementia). This study lasted six months and also had three groups:

  • a twice-weekly strength training group
  • twice- weekly aerobic exercise group
  • and a control group that performed balance and stretching movements.

The strength group improved in their Stroop Test scores, memory, and functional changes were noticed in three brain areas (via MRIs).

The effectiveness of strength training on the mind is not limited to women only. A 2007 study at the Federal University of San Paolo found two and three strength workouts per week led to similar improvements in men who averaged 68 years old.

The men in this study also experienced less anxiety, depression, confusion, and fatigue at the end of this study.

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Researchers in Australia tested the theory of resistance training having the ability to boost brain power. 68 women and 32 men between the ages of 55 and 86, all with mild cognitive impairment were observed.

They were randomly assigned to two groups. The first group did weight training twice a week for six months, lifting 80% of the maximum amount they could. The second group did stretching exercises.

“All participants were given cognitive tests at the beginning and end of the study and 12 months after they finished the study. The group that did the weight training scored significantly higher at the end of the study than at the beginning and retained that gain at 12 months. The gain in test scores was also greatest for those who had the greatest gains in strength. The scores of the group who performed stretching exercises declined somewhat.

It's not too late to strive towards improving mental health. With strength training it only takes 20 minutes, twice a week to give you or your loved ones a better chance at a high quality life.

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More research

Strength training has been shown to be a holistic solution to improving brain function and cognition in general. Here are more studies:

One study done in 2017 looked at adults at least 55 years old, and had:

  • one group doing strength training
  • another group doing some computer version of brain training (puzzles, sudoku, etc.)
  • another group doing stretching, or something that hadn't been shown to improve brain function. (control group)

After six months, strength training by itself was the most effective intervention in all the major areas, including improvements in memory and improvements in Alzheimer's disease score- which predicts the risk for developing Alzheimer's.

You would think “brain training” would have been the winner, but strength training beat it.

In one study, adults in senior living facilities were evaluated on tasks of executive functioning before and after a month-long strengthening, non-aerobic exercise program.

“A total of 16 participants who engaged in such exercise showed significantly improved scores on Digits Backward and Stroop C tasks when compared to 16 participants who were on an exercise waiting list.”

Another interesting study found that cognitive decline is associated with a severe fear of falling: a common fear amongst many older adults.

What’s an easy solution to prevention of falling as well as cognitive decline?

Slow-motion strength training!

CDC recommends it. We provide it.

According to the CDC, there are things you can do to reduce risk of getting Dementia:

  • Maintain a healthy blood pressure level
    • Slow-motion strength training has been proven to lower blood pressure and we’ve helped many clients, like John Abel, get off their blood pressure medication.
  • Manage cholesterol levels with exercise and, if needed, cholesterol medications.
  • Keep blood sugar within a healthy range.
    • Our method has helped clients reduce their A1C levels and get their Diabetes under control
    • “The Perfect Workout is reversing my diabetes and reversing my age. My wife says I don’t even look like I’m in my 50’s.”- Larry H.
  • Get to and maintain a healthy weight.
    • By adding lean muscle mass, your body naturally has the ability to burn more calories, making it easier to lose and maintain weight.
    • Read about some of our success stories here.
  • Reduce hazards in your environment that could lead to falls or head injury.
  • Exercise, including aerobic physical activity.
    • Did you know you can get all the cardiovascular benefits you need from a 20-minute strength training session? Here’s how
  • Get good quality sleep.
    • Strength training improves your ability to fall asleep quicker and quality of sleep
  • Keep your mind active and stimulated, with challenging tasks such as learning a new activity.

The solution is simple

Looking at the research above, strength training offers a unique ability to improve cognitive function in a number of ways, even when signs of decline exist. This benefit can be attained in as little as just one intense workout per week.

Considering that strength training requires minimal time, strengthens bones and muscles, improves cardiovascular health, and the ability to process, recall, and react to life’s demands, it’s hard to see why anyone wouldn’t want to participate.

Liu-Ambrose, T., Nagamatsu, L. S., Graf, P., Beattie, B. L., Ashe, M. C., & Handy, T.C. (2010). Resistance training and executive functions: a 12-month randomized controlled trial. Archives of internal medicine, 170(2), 170.

Nagamatsu, L. S., Handy, T. C., Hsu, C. L., Voss, M., & Liu-Ambrose, T. (2012). Resistance training promotes cognitive and functional brain plasticity in seniors with probable mild cognitive impairment. Archives of internal medicine, 172(8), 666-668.

Cassilhas, R. C., Viana, V. A., Grassmann, V., Santos, R. T., Santos, R. F., Tufik, S. E. R. G. I. O., & Mello, M. T. (2007). The impact of resistance exercise on the cognitive function of the elderly. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 39(8), 1401.

Strength and Your Health

Strength and your health

If you’re reading this article, attaining and maintaining good health over the entire course of your life is probably important to you. Specifically, you probably want to avoid disease and be able to perform all the hobbies and activities that you wish to do. So what general impact do both muscular strength as well as the actual practice of strength training have on health?

A study conducted at the Cooper Institute in Dallas, Texas, looked at the relationship between muscular strength and long-term risk of disease in men [1]. In total, 8,672 men participated, between the ages of 20 and 80. At the start of the study, each participant performed one-repetition maximum tests for the bench press and leg press. These tests are generally considered good ways to represent the muscular strength of the upper and lower body while maintaining testing simplicity and efficiency.

The scores of the bench press and leg press one-rep maximums were combined to form one overall “strength score” for each participant. The men were then grouped into thirds based on their overall strength scores (top third, middle third, and lower third). Comprehensive medical evaluations were also performed at the start of the study to make sure no detrimental health conditions already existed.

After an average follow-up of 19 years, deaths were surveyed. All three groups were assessed by risk of death from any cause, as well as risk of death from either heart disease or cancer.

Before getting into the results, it’s well known that people who strength train tend to have better overall health habits than people who don’t. For example, strength training participants are more likely to be physically active, smoke less, and eat healthier diets. To minimize the interference of other causative factors like these, the researchers adjusted the data to eliminate the influence of physical activity level, age, smoking status, alcohol intake, body mass index, and family history of heart disease.

With that in mind, the level of muscular strength each participant started with was strongly associated with better long-term health. Compared to the lowest strength level group, the middle group had a 28% lower death rate from any cause or death due to cancer only. The middle group also experienced 26% fewer deaths from heart disease. The death rates for the strongest group were very similar to the middle group in all three categories. The lesson here is that for health, men with even a moderate amount of strength have a greatly reduced risk of early death.

A research review from the University of Maryland [2] was more comprehensive than the Cooper Institute study. The researchers gathered 171 studies that mostly included both men and women as well as a wider array of diseases and disease markers. The studies examined included randomized-control trials (which are studies that can prove causation) and observational studies (such as the Cooper Institute study, where researchers can pinpoint associations but not causes).

After condensing the results of the studies, the researchers found that performing strength training has a “moderate to large” impact on improving the following factors:

  • Disease markers (such as triglycerides, blood sugar, etc.)
  • Overall risk of heart disease
  • Ability to do daily activities and overall physical function
  • General weakness and fatigue


The results also showed that strength training has a smaller but positive impact on the following conditions:

  • Blood pressure
  • Bone density
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (specifically the amount of pain and inflammation)
  • Metabolic rate
  • Cognitive function (including those with dementia)


Overall, the research indicates that having even a moderate level of muscular strength provides a lower risk of premature death, especially from heart disease or cancer. And the actual practice of strength training provides enhanced physical and cognitive function while also providing protection from a number of diseases and disease markers.

At The Perfect Workout, optimal strength training requires only two 20-minute workouts per week. Knowing that strength training requires such little time and can give you so many benefits, it’s an understatement to say that it’s time well spent.

1. Ruiz, J. R., Sui, X., Lobelo, F., Morrow Jr, J. R., Jackson, A. W., Sjöström, M., & Blair, S. N. (2008). Association between muscular strength and mortality in men: prospective cohort study. BMJ: British Medical Journal, 337(7661), 92.

2. Hurley, B. F., Hanson, E. D., & Sheaff, A. K. (2011). Strength training as a countermeasure to aging muscle and chronic disease. Sports Medicine, 41(4), 289-306.

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