The Safety of Slow Motion Strength Training

The Safety of Slow Motion Strength Training

Mission Monday Episode 2

Does the risk of a potential injury make you hesitant to exercise? If your answer is “Yes,” this video is for you.

Slow-motion strength training, especially at The Perfect Workout, is EXTREMELY safe. Keep reading to learn why…

Why Exercise Injuries Happen

An Australian research team studied injuries that took place in fitness facilities over a 14 year period. They identified nearly 3,000 injuries during that time.

Here’s the story behind those injuries:

  • 55% of injuries took place during free weight exercises
  • The rest of the injuries mainly occurred during group exercise classes, while using the treadmill, boxing, or during a jumping exercise

All of these activities have something in common: they are NOT a part of slow-motion strength training. Slow training omits these higher-risk activities.

To understand another reason why it’s so safe, let’s go back to high school physics. Injuries commonly occur during exercise when an excess of force is placed on bones, tendons, and ligaments.

When the force during an exercise is more than these different structures can handle, it can lead to a fracture, tear, strain, or sprain.

What is Force?

Newton’s Second Law of Motion states that Force is equal to Mass x Acceleration. This means, if the force of an exercise is too great, that’s because it has an excess of mass or acceleration. Slow-motion strength training limits force by limiting the acceleration.

As you perform an exercise, you are moving at a constant speed — there’s no rapid acceleration at any point. As a result, only a safe amount of force is placed on the bones and connective tissues.

There’s one more reason why slow-motion strength training is so safe. The slow speed enables your personal trainer to have more time to correct form errors. With a slow repetition, a trainer can catch and correct a form error within the same repetition.

Slow-Motion Strength Training is Safe

As a whole, slow-motion training excludes the activities that cause exercise-related injuries, limits the force placed on joints, and provides plenty of time for the trainer to correct form errors.

Slow-motion strength training is an extremely safe and effective way to improve your health, physique, and physical abilities.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Gray, S.E. & Finch, C.F. (2015). The causes of injuries sustained at fitness facilities presenting to Victorian emergency departments – identifying the main culprits. Injury Epidemiology, 2(1), 6.

The Safety of Slow Motion Strength Training

Mission Monday Episode 2

Does the risk of a potential injury make you hesitant to exercise? If your answer is “Yes,” this video is for you.

Slow-motion strength training, especially at The Perfect Workout, is EXTREMELY safe. Keep reading to learn why…

Why Exercise Injuries Happen

An Australian research team studied injuries that took place in fitness facilities over a 14 year period. They identified nearly 3,000 injuries during that time.

Here’s the story behind those injuries:

  • 55% of injuries took place during free weight exercises
  • The rest of the injuries mainly occurred during group exercise classes, while using the treadmill, boxing, or during a jumping exercise

All of these activities have something in common: they are NOT a part of slow-motion strength training. Slow training omits these higher-risk activities.

To understand another reason why it’s so safe, let’s go back to high school physics. Injuries commonly occur during exercise when an excess of force is placed on bones, tendons, and ligaments.

When the force during an exercise is more than these different structures can handle, it can lead to a fracture, tear, strain, or sprain.

What is Force?

Newton’s Second Law of Motion states that Force is equal to Mass x Acceleration. This means, if the force of an exercise is too great, that’s because it has an excess of mass or acceleration. Slow-motion strength training limits force by limiting the acceleration.

As you perform an exercise, you are moving at a constant speed — there’s no rapid acceleration at any point. As a result, only a safe amount of force is placed on the bones and connective tissues.

There’s one more reason why slow-motion strength training is so safe. The slow speed enables your personal trainer to have more time to correct form errors. With a slow repetition, a trainer can catch and correct a form error within the same repetition.

Slow-Motion Strength Training is Safe

As a whole, slow-motion training excludes the activities that cause exercise-related injuries, limits the force placed on joints, and provides plenty of time for the trainer to correct form errors.

Slow-motion strength training is an extremely safe and effective way to improve your health, physique, and physical abilities.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Gray, S.E. & Finch, C.F. (2015). The causes of injuries sustained at fitness facilities presenting to Victorian emergency departments – identifying the main culprits. Injury Epidemiology, 2(1), 6.

Reducing Sports Injury Risk

reducing sports injury risk

According to the National Federation of State High School Associations, football participation in California and Texas has increased steadily for years…until the last two years. Football participation is decreasing in many states over the last two years. This is hardly a surprise. The last few years have also featured numerous stories about NFL players suffering torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL), concussions, and there was a lawsuit where former NFL players sued the league over inadequate warning for concussion risk.

In the 2011-2012 school year, there were nearly 1.4 million estimated sports-related injuries in high schools across the United States (according to the National High School-Related Sports Injury Surveillance Study). While football led the way, sports such as soccer, basketball, and wrestling also produce tens of thousands of injuries per year. How do we protect our kids from athletic injuries? How can we make sports safer?

In addition to looking at changes within the sports themselves, we can also properly prepare the participants. Strength training has demonstrated a clear ability to reduce injury risk for young athletes in research. A review of research from the Journal of Sports Medicine mentioned seven studies with high school athletes that found that a strength training program reduced injury rates in various sports. This is likely due to several reasons. As a bonus, strength training is relatively safe for kids and poses little injury risk itself.

Athletic injuries occur when the force placed on the body exceeds the force our bones, muscles, tendons, and ligaments can withstand. In sports, these forces are often uncontrollable…especially with young athletes. An athlete can safely and effectively move around the field or court, but that still doesn’t stop another player from accidentally crashing into the athlete or misplacing a foot under an athlete as he or she is landing from a jump. Of course, collision isn’t always necessary. For example, even just running can lead to a strained hamstring or front thigh muscle.

Strength training prepares the athletic body to sustain many of these forces. Strength training increases bone strength as well as connective tissue strength, which reduces the risk of bone fractures or tears in tendons or ligaments. Strength training increases muscle size and strength. As an athlete becomes stronger, his or her muscles support more force, which helps during common movements such as jumping and running. In fact, long distance runners are known to adopt strength training to reduce lower body injuries.

The Journal of Sports Medicine review also mentioned strength training as a safe option for young athletes. According to one study, strength training with 13-16-year old boys led to just 3.5 injuries for every 10,000 hours of participation. Another study said strength training was responsible for less than one percent of high school sports injuries each year. From the results of seven studies, the researchers stated, “injury occurrence (with resistance training) in children and adolescents was either very low or nil.”

Strength training physically develops muscles, bones, and connective tissues. As a result of strength training, these various tissues are more able to withstand the various forces on the body that are experienced with athletics. As a bonus, strength training is comparatively very safe. Injury risk is extremely low in general and when compared to other sports. At this point, I imagine the only question parents have about strength training with their youngsters is, “What are we waiting for?!”

  1. Faigenbaum, A. D., & Myer, G. D. (2010). Resistance training among young athletes: safety, efficacy and injury prevention effects. British journal of sports medicine, 44(1), 56-63.

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