Top 5 Tips to Prevent Injuries When You Exercise

5 Tips to Prevent Injuries When You Exercise

5 Tips to Prevent Injuries When You Exercise

5 Tips to Prevent Injuries When You Exercise Blog featured image

Strength training is an extremely effective method for improving health and making our bodies more resistant to injury.

Unfortunately, people are often injured during exercise, leading them to quit and lose the benefits that exercise can provide.

In fact, according to an analysis of Consumer Product Safety Commission data from MedicareAdvantage.com, at-home exercise injuries that resulted in a visit to the emergency room increased by more than 48% from 2019 to 2020, likely due to people increasing at-home exercise during Covid shutdown. And nearly 30% of all exercise-related injuries suffered in the home were among people aged 65 and older.

In this article, we’ll talk about common exercise-related injuries and how you can prevent injury by exercising safely.

Consistent exercise is one of the healthiest habits we can have. Unfortunately, the majority of people don’t exercise enough to reap the health benefits (Harris et al., 2011). Some of the common reasons for not exercising include exercise being “painful” and a fear of getting injured (Justine et al., 2013).

This is concerning because exercise is actually extremely safe when executed properly. However, it’s understandable because poor exercise practices are common, which have led to an increase in exercise injuries over the past few decades (Jones, Christensen, & Young, 2015).

There are a few common injuries that people suffer during exercise. Thankfully, these are easily avoided with a few simple approaches.

a person is holding their injured knee

Common Injuries​

According to one long-term study, about 64% of exercise injuries occur in one of three areas of the body (Kerr, Collins, & Cornstock, 2010).

  • The most commonly injured area is the shoulders/neck region. About 1 in 4 injuries affect this area.
  • The lower back (21%) and the hands (18.6%) are also frequently injured.

Common Causes of Exercise Injuries

The vast majority of injuries that occur in the gym happen in 1 of 6 ways (Gray & Finch, 2015).

These are the six (in no particular order):

  1. Tripping/falling while using motorized equipment (e.g. treadmill).
  2. Tripping/falling elsewhere in the gym (e.g. walking around the gym or during a group exercise class).
  3. Making contact with a wall or other equipment.
  4. Being crushed by dropped equipment.
  5. Awkward/improper landing during exercises (e.g. jumping exercises, during a group exercise class).
  6. Overexertion/overuse/excessively strenuous movements.

In this study, which tracked injuries in fitness facilities over a 14-year period, the six categories above included 90% of injuries.

As you can see, accidents and poorly-executed exercises underlie all of these injuries. Thankfully, these are all easily avoided with a few safe exercise practices.

5 Tips for Safe Exercise

1. Use machines instead of free weights

Want to avoid getting crushed by weights? Want to avoid hurting your back in an effort to lift weight?

In the aforementioned 14-year study, 55% of exercise injuries involved free weight exercises (Gray & Finch, 2015). A simple way to cut out a large injury risk is to use machines instead of free weights.

Machines mimic free weight movements, achieve comparable outcomes, and eliminate the risk of being injured by falling weights.

2. Choose low-impact exercises instead of high-impact activities

Most exercise injuries take place during free weight exercises…but where do the rest of the injuries take place?

Virtually all of the other injuries take place during high-impact activities: group aerobics classes, boxing, running on the treadmill, and jumping exercises.

These activities include two opportunities for injury. First, there’s high stress on the joints (knee, hip, lower back) when the impact is made. This impact includes landing from a step or jump. Second, if the landing isn’t proper, an ankle or wrist could be sprained.

Low-impact activities include movements where joints don’t suffer from limbs accelerating into the ground or an object.

Slow-motion strength training is a low-impact exercise. For example, in the leg press, the feet remain in contact with the footplate and the knee joint is never locked out – allowing the muscles to bear the majority of weight instead of the joint.

Walking and cycling are also low-impact activities, where joints are experiencing minimal stress.

3. Move slowly and at a consistent pace.

Injuries occur when there is too much force placed on the joints. Force, as you might recall from high school physics, equals mass times acceleration.

If you move at a constant speed, acceleration is minimal, keeping force at a lower and safer amount.

Imagine running as fast as you can at a wall– there’s a lot of acceleration and force behind you. That collision will surely hurt and result in injury.

Now imagine placing your hands on the wall and pushing against it with 25% strength, then 50% strength, then 100% strength. There’s practically no acceleration and the force against the wall can be controlled and abandoned at any time.

There is no collision, and certainly no injury.

This is a vital reason why we lift using slow speeds at The Perfect Workout. 10 seconds up and 10 seconds down!

4. Prioritize form over weight.

When strength training, the weights that you lift should be challenging at the start and finish… nearly impossible by the end of the set. However, the weights shouldn’t be impossible with good form at the start.

Common causes of injury when trying to “max out” (using the most weight you can lift for one rep) or losing proper form when lifting very heavy weight loads (ExRx.net, n.d.).

This is where the keen eye and coaching of a Personal Trainer are beneficial. They can select an appropriate resistance for each individual and coach you through nuances to achieve perfect form. They can also tell when form is breaking and help safely stop an exercise before you risk injury with improper form.

5. Train muscles in a balanced fashion.

A number of shoulder injuries, lower back pain, and muscle imbalances can come from training muscles unevenly (ExRx.net, n.d.). Examples of this are training your chest more than your back, training your quads more than your hamstrings, or training your biceps more than your triceps.

To avoid this, train all major muscle groups to an even amount.

In a traditional slow-motion workout, like what you get at The Perfect Workout, we can exercise every major muscle group every session.

trainer showing a male client his progress on the compound row

Key Takeaways

Exercise should strengthen your body, not damage it. Unfortunately, exercise injuries have increased over the past few decades. These are especially common in the neck, shoulders, lower back, and hands.

Thankfully, injuries can be avoided with a few simple practices.

  • Choose machines over free weights.
  • Use low-impact exercises and activities.
  • Strength train with a consistent pace and a challenging but not impossible weight.
  • Practice good form.
  • Train your muscles evenly, avoiding an excessive amount of exercise for one particular muscle group.

Of course, if you are not sure how to execute these tips, speak with one of our Personal Trainers who will guide you through a very safe and effective exercise program.

  • ExRx.net. (n.d.). Weight training injury risk factors. Retrieved from http://www.exrx.net/WeightTraining/RiskFactors.html
  • Gray, S.E. & Finch, C.F. (2015). The causes of injuries sustained at fitness facilities presenting to Victorian emergency departments – identifying the main culprits. Injury Epidemiology, 2(1), 6.
  • Harris, C.D., Watson, K.B., Carlson, S.A., Fulton, J.E., & Dorn, J.M. (2011). Adult participation in aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activities — United States, 2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 62(17), 326-330.
  • Jones, C.S., Christensen, C., & Young, M. (2015). Weight training injury trends. The Physician and Sportsmedicine, 28(7), 61-72.
  • Justine, M., Azizan, A., Hassan, V., Salleh, Z., & Manaf, H. (2013). Barriers to participation in physical activity and exercise among middle-aged and elderly individuals. Singapore Medicine Journal, 54(10), 581-586.
  • Kerr, Z.Y., Collins, C.L., & Comstock, R.D. (2010). Epidemiology of weight training-related injuries presenting to United States emergency departments. American Journal of Sports Medicine, 38(4), 765-771.

Is It Safe to Strength Train While Pregnant?

Is It Safe to Strength Train While Pregnant?

Mission Monday Episode 3

Over 60% of expectant mothers do not exercise during pregnancy.

Some of these cases are high-risk pregnancies, where extreme caution is required.

For other expectant mothers, is it safe to strength train?

Health Concerns For Strength Training While Pregnant

Physiologically, the most commonly identified concerns are potential damage to the fetus, hyperthermia, and disrupting the regular blood flow to the fetus.

Several studies show that these concerns are just that — they are ONLY concerns. Strength training does not actually cause those potential issues.

Most importantly, strength training does NOT increase the risk of a miscarriage or any negative labor side effects.

As a whole, strength training is safe for pregnant women.

It Can Actually Be Dangerous To Not Exercise During Pregnancy

Inactivity during pregnancy could lead to excess weight gain and a large loss of muscle tissue. In addition, inactivity enhances the chances of developing gestational diabetes.

Strength training can prevent all of these concerns, plus provide other benefits. Some of these benefits include:

  • Improving posture
  • Strengthening key muscles that are involved in labor
  • Having less strain during labor
  • Decreasing the chances of suffering lower back pain
  • AND…reducing the risk of preeclampsia by anywhere from 24 to 54%

Strength training is not only a good choice for the mom. Babies from strength-trained moms are generally longer and have more lean mass.

The research identified a few safety considerations for mothers going into strength training. To maximize safety, avoid holding your breath during exercise, stay away from exercises that can cause potential bone and ligament injuries — such as deadlifts and back squats — and avoid overhead lifts after the first trimester.

Follow Your Physician’s Lead

If your doctor supports strength training, go for it. The research shows that strength training during pregnancy is not only safe for the mother and the fetus, but it reduces pregnancy and labor pains, decreases the risk of common pregnancy-related health problems, and helps ensure a safe amount of weight gain

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Pujol, T. J., Barnes, J. T., Elder, C. L., & LaFontaine, T. (2007). Resistance training during pregnancy. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 29(2), 44-46.
  • Schoenfeld, B. (2011). Resistance training during pregnancy: safe and effective program design. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 33(5), 67-75.
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Is It Safe to Strength Train While Pregnant?

Mission Monday Episode 3

Over 60% of expectant mothers do not exercise during pregnancy.

Some of these cases are high-risk pregnancies, where extreme caution is required.

For other expectant mothers, is it safe to strength train?

Health Concerns For Strength Training While Pregnant

Physiologically, the most commonly identified concerns are potential damage to the fetus, hyperthermia, and disrupting the regular blood flow to the fetus.

Several studies show that these concerns are just that — they are ONLY concerns. Strength training does not actually cause those potential issues.

Most importantly, strength training does NOT increase the risk of a miscarriage or any negative labor side effects.

As a whole, strength training is safe for pregnant women.

It Can Actually Be Dangerous To Not Exercise During Pregnancy

Inactivity during pregnancy could lead to excess weight gain and a large loss of muscle tissue. In addition, inactivity enhances the chances of developing gestational diabetes.

Strength training can prevent all of these concerns, plus provide other benefits. Some of these benefits include:

  • Improving posture
  • Strengthening key muscles that are involved in labor
  • Having less strain during labor
  • Decreasing the chances of suffering lower back pain
  • AND…reducing the risk of preeclampsia by anywhere from 24 to 54%


Strength training is not only a good choice for the mom. Babies from strength-trained moms are generally longer and have more lean mass.

The research identified a few safety considerations for mothers going into strength training. To maximize safety, avoid holding your breath during exercise, stay away from exercises that can cause potential bone and ligament injuries — such as deadlifts and back squats — and avoid overhead lifts after the first trimester.

Follow Your Physician’s Lead

If your doctor supports strength training, go for it. The research shows that strength training during pregnancy is not only safe for the mother and the fetus, but it reduces pregnancy and labor pains, decreases the risk of common pregnancy-related health problems, and helps ensure a safe amount of weight gain.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Pujol, T. J., Barnes, J. T., Elder, C. L., & LaFontaine, T. (2007). Resistance training during pregnancy. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 29(2), 44-46.
  • Schoenfeld, B. (2011). Resistance training during pregnancy: safe and effective program design. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 33(5), 67-75.
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The Safety of Slow Motion Strength Training

The Safety of Slow Motion Strength Training

Mission Monday Episode 2

Does the risk of a potential injury make you hesitant to exercise? If your answer is “Yes,” this video is for you.

Slow-motion strength training, especially at The Perfect Workout, is EXTREMELY safe. Keep reading to learn why…

Why Exercise Injuries Happen

An Australian research team studied injuries that took place in fitness facilities over a 14 year period. They identified nearly 3,000 injuries during that time.

Here’s the story behind those injuries:

  • 55% of injuries took place during free weight exercises
  • The rest of the injuries mainly occurred during group exercise classes, while using the treadmill, boxing, or during a jumping exercise

All of these activities have something in common: they are NOT a part of slow-motion strength training. Slow training omits these higher-risk activities.

To understand another reason why it’s so safe, let’s go back to high school physics. Injuries commonly occur during exercise when an excess of force is placed on bones, tendons, and ligaments.

When the force during an exercise is more than these different structures can handle, it can lead to a fracture, tear, strain, or sprain.

What is Force?

Newton’s Second Law of Motion states that Force is equal to Mass x Acceleration. This means, if the force of an exercise is too great, that’s because it has an excess of mass or acceleration. Slow-motion strength training limits force by limiting the acceleration.

As you perform an exercise, you are moving at a constant speed — there’s no rapid acceleration at any point. As a result, only a safe amount of force is placed on the bones and connective tissues.

There’s one more reason why slow-motion strength training is so safe. The slow speed enables your personal trainer to have more time to correct form errors. With a slow repetition, a trainer can catch and correct a form error within the same repetition.

Slow-Motion Strength Training is Safe

As a whole, slow-motion training excludes the activities that cause exercise-related injuries, limits the force placed on joints, and provides plenty of time for the trainer to correct form errors.

Slow-motion strength training is an extremely safe and effective way to improve your health, physique, and physical abilities.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Gray, S.E. & Finch, C.F. (2015). The causes of injuries sustained at fitness facilities presenting to Victorian emergency departments – identifying the main culprits. Injury Epidemiology, 2(1), 6.
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The Safety of Slow Motion Strength Training

Mission Monday Episode 2

Does the risk of a potential injury make you hesitant to exercise? If your answer is “Yes,” this video is for you.

Slow-motion strength training, especially at The Perfect Workout, is EXTREMELY safe. Keep reading to learn why…

Why Exercise Injuries Happen

An Australian research team studied injuries that took place in fitness facilities over a 14 year period. They identified nearly 3,000 injuries during that time.

Here’s the story behind those injuries:

  • 55% of injuries took place during free weight exercises
  • The rest of the injuries mainly occurred during group exercise classes, while using the treadmill, boxing, or during a jumping exercise

All of these activities have something in common: they are NOT a part of slow-motion strength training. Slow training omits these higher-risk activities.

To understand another reason why it’s so safe, let’s go back to high school physics. Injuries commonly occur during exercise when an excess of force is placed on bones, tendons, and ligaments.

When the force during an exercise is more than these different structures can handle, it can lead to a fracture, tear, strain, or sprain.

What is Force?

Newton’s Second Law of Motion states that Force is equal to Mass x Acceleration. This means, if the force of an exercise is too great, that’s because it has an excess of mass or acceleration. Slow-motion strength training limits force by limiting the acceleration.

As you perform an exercise, you are moving at a constant speed — there’s no rapid acceleration at any point. As a result, only a safe amount of force is placed on the bones and connective tissues.

There’s one more reason why slow-motion strength training is so safe. The slow speed enables your personal trainer to have more time to correct form errors. With a slow repetition, a trainer can catch and correct a form error within the same repetition.

Slow-Motion Strength Training is Safe

As a whole, slow-motion training excludes the activities that cause exercise-related injuries, limits the force placed on joints, and provides plenty of time for the trainer to correct form errors.

Slow-motion strength training is an extremely safe and effective way to improve your health, physique, and physical abilities.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Gray, S.E. & Finch, C.F. (2015). The causes of injuries sustained at fitness facilities presenting to Victorian emergency departments – identifying the main culprits. Injury Epidemiology, 2(1), 6.
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Is a Personal Trainer Worth It?

Is a personal trainer worth it?

We lay out all of the research-backed facts, so you can decide for yourself.

Female Personal Trainer with real female client

The hardest thing about starting a fitness journey is simply starting. The second hardest? Knowing what to do to actually get results.

Part of this struggle comes from seeing social media feeds with workouts, meal plans, and transformation photos – not to mention a million diet products being marketed to us all day, every day. It’s confusing.

The other part is trying to do it alone.

Every fitness journey is unique, but one major catalyst to achieving desired health and wellness results is having someone to coach you- a personal trainer.

You may ask yourself, is a personal trainer worth it?

In this article, we talk about the research-proven advantages of working with a personal trainer and why it's absolutely worth it.

Jump to a Topic:

7 Benefits of Working with a Personal Trainer

Studies comparing people working with personal trainers versus people who trained themselves found that working with a professional trainer offers the following benefits:

7 Benefits of Personal Training Infographic

1. Better Workout Quality

Too many of us know firsthand that it's possible to work out – a lot – and see no results.

The “magic” of strength training is a result of a few ingredients, including choosing the right resistance for each exercise and putting in enough effort.

Research shows that when not working with a personal trainer, only 9-34% of trainees choose weights that are challenging enough to provide great results (Dos Santos et al., 2020).

People also generally fail to work hard enough without a trainer. In one study, about 57% of people without a trainer failed to push to complete exhaustion (“Muscle Success”) on ANY exercise (Dos Santos et al., 2020).

Whether you get results is entirely up to you and the effort you put forth. But a Personal Trainer has the knowledge and passion to help you give it your all.

Research shows that supervised exercise leads to achieving more strength, muscle growth, and weight loss (Mazzetti et al., 2000).

Two separate studies by Wayne Westcott, Ph.D., and one study by Ellington Darden, Ph.D., demonstrate that slow-motion strength training produces 50% to 59% faster improvements than regular weight training.

Any challenging workout, like slow-motion strength training, is a physical and mental feat. This makes it incredibly easy to talk yourself out of giving your best effort when the exercise becomes tough and your muscles start to burn.

A Personal Trainer is the coach in your corner pushing you to give your absolute best. They become the voice you need when your own starts to deceive you.

2. Exercise Safety

Working out alone? It’s easy to perform exercises incorrectly without someone watching your form or correcting bad habits. After all, you don’t know what you don’t know and could be exercising with incorrect form every time you’re in the gym.

Working out with a friend? Having a workout buddy can be great because it increases your chances of sticking with it. But taking direction from someone who is not Certified is like having your friend “crack your back” instead of getting adjusted by a Chiropractor. Despite the good intentions, relying on someone other than a trained professional could do more harm than good.

A Certified Fitness Trainer should have extensive education on how to safely coach others through an effective workout.

At The Perfect Workout, our certification goes beyond books and heavily involves hands-on training with real people. We test our trainers’ knowledge and expertise with numerous written and practical exams. All Personal Trainers are AED/CPR certified and are required to complete continuing education as part of their employment with The Perfect Workout.

real member testimonial about personal trainers being worth it
Real Male client testimonial

3. Staying Motivated, Consistent, & Accountable

Exercise helps with health and longevity, but it doesn’t work if people don’t do it consistently.

Only one in five adults in the US consistently reach the recommended amount of weekly exercise (Harris et al., 2011).

When starting an exercise program, about half quit within six months (Larson et al., 2018).

The vast majority of people don’t hire personal trainers. Looking at the data, this approach isn’t working.

Considering about half of people quit workout programs within six months, strategies to stick with exercise are critical to reaching one’s fitness goals.

Studies show that people who work with personal trainers are more likely to develop a better attitude towards sticking with exercise (McClaran, 2003). In addition, people are also more likely to develop strategies for overcoming obstacles that would otherwise cause them to quit.

If that’s not enough, hear what some of our clients have to say about how we help with consistency:

  1. “I can do anything for 20 minutes, twice a week.”
  2. “20 minutes, twice a week made it easy to stick with it.”
  3. “I look forward to my personal training sessions.”
  4. “I see the benefits and I’m getting results, so I know it’s working.”
  5. “My trainers encourage me when I want to give up.”
  6. “It’s a great routine to start out the day.”
  7. “I like having an appointment on the books. It helps me stay accountable.”

Working with a trainer provides an additional level of accountability that is likely needed by most people.

Chances are you don’t bail on your doctor when you need a checkup, but it's really easy to bail on your workouts when you’re doing them on your own.

Why is that?

Because when you have an appointment on your calendar and another human on the other end of the appointment counting on you to show up, you do it.

By keeping you accountable, they ultimately keep you consistent and consistency breeds results.

Real client's personal trainer testimonial

4. Professional Guidance

Believe it or not, there is a method to exercising safely and effectively. A Personal Trainer will analyze your ability and your performance to decide how to continually challenge you.

This includes how to properly adjust your body to workout equipment, whether or not to increase or decrease range of motion on an exercise, to lower or raise the weight, etc.

The results are in the details, and a Personal Trainer knows what to look for.

Playing the role of a professional for our own needs benefits us by saving money. We trade our time to learn and develop skills to save the cost that comes with hiring a professional.

Besides coaching and providing accountability, working with a personal trainer makes sense for several reasons. We are limited by time, having only 24 hours each day to sleep, eat, work, spend time with family, manage our homes, etc.

We simply don’t have the time to be “professionals” in many areas. Outsourcing that responsibility to a professional saves time. It also ensures that we’ll receive more educated and experienced guidance with in-session coaching and overall workout program design.

But many people try to serve as their own personal trainers.

People design their own workout plans, coach themselves through their training sessions, and guide their own long-term fitness journeys.

Unless you’re a doctor, a physical therapist or you’ve been in the fitness industry before, chances are a Personal Trainer knows more about health and fitness than you do.

You wouldn’t try to clean your own teeth instead of going to the Dentist. So why would you try and improve your physical health on your own?

In addition, you learn new things about your body, your health, and your habits when you work with a Personal Trainer. And the more you know, the more opportunities you have to make changes you may need to reach your goals.

5. Workout Customization

A Personal trainer makes your workout personal. Everyone’s body, fitness level, and abilities are different.

A good trainer will not have the 45yr old man who wants to lose 30lbs do the same exact thing as the 77yr old woman who wants to reverse osteoporosis.

It's necessary to tailor any exercise approach to the individual’s goals.

Although group classes or follow-along- guides can be fun, you don’t get the customized approach. You don't have someone completely focused on you to see if you’re doing an exercise correctly, doing it safely.

A video, guide, or group fitness instructor doesn’t know your goals, your injuries, limitations or how you tend to hold your breath a little before you hit muscle success.

At The Perfect Workout, your first session with a Personal Trainer dives deep into your goals and health history so we can best help you achieve your health and fitness vision.

6. Judgement-Free

Walking into a big box gym can be an intimidating experience. You may think others are watching you workout, judging how you look, or why you’re lifting weights that way. This makes exercise an uncomfortable experience.

A Personal Trainer is devoted to helping you look and feel your best. You don’t have to worry about what you look like, how little you know about exercise or how many times you’ve failed your diets in the past.

This is a safe space where you can share your fitness needs and ask your trainer all kinds of questions, even ones that you might feel silly asking.

At the Perfect Workout, you’ll work with a Trainer every single workout and will always be in the comfort of a semi-private environment.

Real testimonial from Female client, who is with her dog

7. Support System

When you work with a personal trainer, you sign up for an overall transformation. Losing weight and gaining strength are common reasons people start a new workout program. However, gaining confidence, improving mental health, and learning to love their bodies, are some of the biggest and best benefits of working with a Trainer.

A Personal Trainer is your built in support system for this journey you’re on and at The Perfect Workout, you’re never at it alone.

So... IS a Personal Trainer Worth It?

Working with a personal trainer has tremendous value. A trainer’s supervision leads to more effective workouts. It helps us stick with a fitness program. Ultimately, a personal trainer’s help greatly increases the chances that we’ll reach our health and fitness goals (Losch et al., 2016). .

Bias aside, we’d say a personal trainer is definitely worth it. 😏

  • Dos Santos, W. M., Junior, A. C. T., Braz, T. V., Lopes, C. R., Brigatto, F. A., & Dos Santos, J. W. (2020). Resistance-trained individuals can underestimate the intensity of the resistance training session: an analysis among genders, training experience, and exercises. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research.
  • Harris, C.D., Watson, K.B., Carlson, S.A., Fulton, J.E., & Dorn, J.M. (2011). Adult participation in aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activities — United States, 2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 62(17), 326-330.
  • Larson, H.K., McFadden, K., McHugh, T.F., Berry, T.R., & Rodgers, W.M. (2018). When you don’t get what you want–and it’s really hard: exploring motivational contributions to exercise dropout. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 37, 59-66. 
  • Mazzetti, S.A., Kraemer, W.J., Volek, J.S., Duncan, N.D., Ratamess, N.A., Gomez, A.L., … Fleck, S.J. (2000). The influence of direct supervision of resistance training on strength performance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 32(6), 1175-1184.
  • McClaran, S.R. (2003). The effectiveness of personal training on changing attitudes towards physical activity. Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, 2(1), 10-14.
  • Losch, Sabine et al. “Comparing the Effectiveness of Individual Coaching, Self-Coaching, and Group Training: How Leadership Makes the Difference.” Frontiers in psychology vol. 7 629. 3 May. 2016, doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00629

Traded Local Gym Membership for Private Training

Why He traded his local gym membership for private training

John Gilbert Featured Image

John Gilbert was a long-time member of a local Orange County gym chain. When the pandemic hit, he had to stop. 

But, when the chain was allowed to reopen, the thought of going back to the gym made him feel unsure and uncomfortable.  

It wasn’t staffed most of the time, and members could just badge in and out. And the hygiene program wasn’t super good there. I just didn't feel comfortable going back.”

Luckily, his wife had been training at The Perfect Workout’s Tustin studio for a couple of years, and she was a big fan.

So, he decided to take the plunge.

Carol Gilbert Quote

A Private, Safe Workout Space Curbed His Fears

Because the Tustin facility (and all 62 locations) follow strict CDC guidelines to keep the workout space clean and safe, John felt like it was time to make the switch from gym to private personal training.

Everything's clean. It's only you and the trainer in the studio… So, it's very safe compared to a free-for-all, members going in and out, without any staff and without any control over who touches what.”

He isn't planning on going back to his old gym because The Perfect Workout, for him, is literally perfect!  In just 20 minutes, he can get a good strenuous workout. Something which took an hour and 15 minutes to accomplish back at his old gym.

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20 Minutes, Twice A Week With A Trainer And He Feels Way More Energetic Than Before

After barely two months, John already felt like he had more energy than before. 

Each workout is a little different as Angela, his trainer, changes up the exercises and keeps the workout at an ideal intensity level.

Back at his old gym, he was doing the traditional way of weight lifting, doing three sets of 10 to 15 reps. Slow-motion strength training was completely new to him. 

“This is a lot more strenuous.”

One thing that he really likes about the private setting is working out with the guidance of a trainer and the focused attention he gets on each exercise. 

Back straight, drop your shoulders, engage your core, feet planted!” 

Previously, without a trainer, John admits he would normally stop when muscles were starting to fatigue.

“It was difficult to continue and push myself.” But with the help of his trainers’ coaching and encouragement, he’s able to push more than he ever thought possible.  

It's amazing that you can do so much more with somebody there.” 

At The Perfect Workout, you get the value of coaching and undivided attention of a Personal Trainer, whether you train in the studio or virtually.

You can expect to get:

  • Personalized instruction and guidance on how to do each exercise
  • Safe and challenging workout
  • Adaptations to the workout depending on your ability, environment, and desired intensity level
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High Risk? Remain Safe & Strong At Home

High risk? Remain safe & strong at home

Personal Trainer SW Fort Worth TX
We’re all trying to figure out what our priorities are right now. But there’s one thing that’s at the top of everyone’s list- safety. Am I safe from this virus? When will it be safe to go places? Are my friends and family safe? There are a lot of questions up in the air– but one thing you should never have to question is the safety of your workout.

Lin Rowland and John Aspebakken’s journey with The Perfect Workout started with Lin's decision to take control of his fitness journey. He had been going to bootcamps, which had become really rough on his body. As he was getting a little bit older, he felt like that style of training wasn’t safe for him and he couldn’t really sustain it any longer.

We actually see this a lot, because most workouts and programs out there have a shelf-life on them.

Runners will run, until their knees wear out.
Crossfitters will flip tires, until they throw their back out.
Bootcampers will…bootcamp? Until it's not sustainable anymore.

That’s one of the many incredible benefits of slow-motion strength training. It is the ultimate sustainable workout. Think about it– how many programs do you know of that have clients ranging from 11- 95 years of age? Not many, but The Perfect Workout does.

Back to Lin– his fitness journey changed when he saw a sign. An actual, physical sign that is. (Be sure to watch the video for a good laugh we had when I thought he meant a metaphorical sign ?)

He waltzed into the Southwest Fort Worth Studio one Saturday and said, “I’m interested in finding out what this is about!” He got to chatting with one of the Trainers who took her time to learn about his fitness goals, teach him the method and sent him home with more information than he could ask for on slow-motion strength training, along with a 1-on-1 workout on the schedule.

From that moment, Lin became a client and part of The Perfect Workout Family.

“It just seemed interesting and what I really liked about it was it seemed really safe.”

After actually going through the workout, Lin also appreciated (I’m sure begrudgingly at times) that his Trainer “watched him like a hawk.” Having worked out in other gyms and facilities where they show you how to do the machine and then walk away, he felt like the personal attention he got from 1-on-1 coaching at The Perfect Workout was something special.

“I don’t know that one person can watch 30 people at once and correct them,” Lin said in regards to other gyms he’s been to.

Personal Training SW Fort Worth TX

John (who’d been quietly listening) immediately chimed in to tell me that they had taken a couple vacations last year to Pennsylvania and California, where we luckily had studio locations and they were able to get in a training session.

“They had the machines, all of the information on us…”

“And it was the exact. Same. Thing,” Lin interjected. “And they knew everything about us– It was the exact same training experience as here – on both coasts.”

I took a moment to give them kudos for getting into the studios on their vacations, and the thought of training during holiday got me curious about if they would do Virtual Training if they traveled to places with no studio locations….

I tabled my thoughts on vacation workouts because I wanted to hear more about John and his beginnings with The Perfect Workout.

He had retired a few years ago and had never done any bootcamps, gone to gyms, or anything related to an exercise program. I didn’t even have to ask why because he offered up the answer– “I didn’t want to invest the time.”

But after watching Lin come home twice a week, every week for six months with glowing reviews about what he was experiencing at The Perfect Workout– and the fact that it was 20 minutes, a couple times a week– it really appealed to John.

He liked that he didn’t have to take a bunch of time out of his week and devote it to exercise. He also knew that at his age, he wanted to build and keep strength in his muscles and maintain his balance. He wanted the ability to do things around the house.

He finally said to Lin, “You know, I’d kinda like to try this too, and see how it works.”

John joined Lin in the studio one day, experienced some of the exercises and signed up!

Fitness Trainer in SW Fort Worth TX
“We both coordinated our schedules so we both go right one after the other when we go there and it’s worked out tremendously. I just feel a whole lot better strength-wise and balance wise and posture-wise. I’ve noticed I sit up straighter and just a whole lot of improvements that I’ve seen since then.”
Strength-Training-SW-Fort-Worth-TX

Excited about his partner’s progress, Lin also mentioned that John is able to get up and down off the floor more easily too, casually demonstrating that before he got stronger, it included a lot of grunting and groaning as if it were painful.

“And now he just gets right up!”

Fitness Trainer SW Fort Worth TX

I couldn’t help but also celebrate this seemingly small victory, pointing out that changes in every-day activities is one of the many unexpected benefits of doing slow-motion strength training. We often go into our workouts with the mentality of just getting stronger, or losing weight, or maybe improving a medical issue, but it’s when you start to notice an improvement in those day to day activities that makes you stop and think, Wow…this is doing something!

Both John and Lin agreed, telling me they noticed it doing other simple things like pulling the groceries out of the trunk of the car.

“Something simple like that seems simple, but after a while is not so simple,” Lin put it perfectly.

I couldn’t wait any longer to hear what their Virtual Training experience has been like, so I switched gears– I asked both John and Lin what they thought when we said, “Hey! We’ll train you from your living room!”

Like many, they were skeptical at first. They both rattled off their initial thoughts–

“Man, there’s no way!”
“Without the machines and everything else, how well can you really do this?”
“How are you going to be able to monitor how we’re doing very well?”
“It’s not the same thing.”

Despite their skepticism, they felt like they might as well try it– and they pivoted their workout approach, right alongside us.

“We jumped right in the following week after we couldn’t go to the studio anymore and we started working with Hannah (the SWFW Facility Manager)– We all took a moment to agree how amazing yet another one of our trainers is.

I asked them how their first Virtual session went…

“It was tougher than I thought it would be. Way tougher than I thought it would be!” Lin responded as he began to laugh about the “state of the art” equipment they were using in their living room.

I needed to see this– what were they working out with?

They pulled out their state-of-the-art equipment to show me. “It’s a bag of bricks! And a couple towels. And some pillows.”

Strength Trainer in SW Fort Worth TX

Lin began to tell me that although it was “just a towel,” his trainer was able to utilize it during his exercise and it was challenging enough to make him shake. “Shakin and cryin” were his words to be exact. ?

“What makes working out with your body, or the towel, or the grocery bag of bricks more challenging than you thought it was going to be?” I asked.

They explained it was the slowness of the exercises. That doing it so slowly and precisely was the key component, not necessarily their equipment. After all, they were exercising with towels and bricks!

“Do you think this is something you could do on your own without the coaching from Hannah or whoever else you might be working with?” I asked them both.

“Oh, I would never push myself that hard. Somehow she’s able to just drive you through that wall where you’re just like, no, no, no, never again! Get me out of here!” Lin replied laughing.

John chimed in too, “That and your form and position. She’s just watching every move I make… ‘Raise your elbows, lower your shoulders,’ or whatever. There’s just so many things to monitor and keep track of, it’s just good to have somebody there watching you and seeing how you’re doing and that really makes a difference. And that’s one reason I was really excited about doing this program, because I knew I would have somebody there watching me.”

Fitness Training SW Fort Worth TX

They both commented on the importance of the safety factor. They feel safe having a trainer with them every rep of the way. And they feel just as safe during their Virtual Workouts as they do with their in-studio sessions.

In addition to the safety component, Lin couldn’t help but bring up how difficult the workout actually is again. “It’s pretty amazing.” To which he couldn’t help but mention feeling the same way about our team members, telling me that everyone has been incredible, and incredible quality.

Knowing how important it is to have wonderful Trainers on our team, I made a point to thank him for his compliment and also to reiterate that every one of us (trainers, and non-trainers) wants to help our clients get healthier, stay safe, and keep working out– especially during this uncertain time.

I wanted to explore why else they felt like their at-home workouts were so safe. Was it just the slow speed, or was there something else their Trainer was doing?

John explained that he dealt with some long-time back problems but was always reassured with a modification in the exercises he performed. “When I walk out of the session, whether it was at the studio or here, my back is feeling better at the end of the day.”

“There’s always the workaround that is helpful. And it still pushes you ahead,” Lin agreed. “And it's still difficult!”

“It’s still brutal,” John added.

I laughed, joking with them they were going to scare people away calling the workout brutal, but was happy to hear that the intensity of their Virtual Workouts rivaled what they typically experience in the studio.

“Once the closures have been lifted and we’re able to open the doors back to our studios, do either of you see yourselves doing virtual training again for whatever reason?”

John seemed to have an idea forming in his head when he told me he could see them doing a Virtual Session while on vacation, if they happen to be someplace where there wasn’t a studio available.

Ahh the question I tabled earlier was answered after all!

Lin lit up at the idea, agreeing how perfect that would be. “It’s really inventive and outside the box and it’s just been amazing, really.”

Personal Trainer in SW Fort Worth TX

As if both men hadn’t said enough wonderful things about their experience yet, I asked them what they would say to anybody who is on the fence to try Virtual Personal Training. Here’s what they said:

“Try it, because I think you’re gonna be shocked. I think you’re gonna be shocked at the intensity and still feel benefits. That’s what’s important. You’re still going to have those benefits of balance and being able to pull the groceries out of the trunk again.”

“I think you would be surprised at how personable it is through the screen, which doesn’t make any sense because they’re not there with you, but… it’s still personable, they’re still there with you, and they can still see what you’re doing, and they’ll still catch ya!”

Lin had been looking for a safe way to exercise, and John simply couldn’t ignore the time efficiency and the effectiveness of 20 minutes, twice a week. But what they didn’t expect when they joined The Perfect Workout was that they found a workout they could do forever… no matter their age, their ability, or their location.

Nobody knows how long we will all be sheltering in place. But, it’s important to all of us at The Perfect Workout to ensure you don’t lose out on a lot of the benefits we’ve worked so hard in-studio to gain.

Maintain your strength so you aren’t starting back from ground zero again.