Training for Strength or Hypertrophy

Training for Strength or Hypertrophy

Mission Monday Episode 7

What are your training goals?

Are you looking to get stronger? Are you looking to build muscle?

Those two goals are mentioned together so often that they seem like the same goal.
But…they are not.

They are different goals that require different training approaches.

Before we talk about training approaches, let's define each one…

Muscle Strength vs Size

Muscle strength is the greatest amount of weight that can be lifted with movement.

Strength is a functional quality. Strength is useful to you as having more strength makes the other activities in your life easier.

For example, as you gain strength, it’s easier to walk upstairs, carry bags of groceries, or move furniture.

Gaining muscle size, which is known as muscle hypertrophy, is when muscle cells become larger.

Muscle size is obviously an aesthetic quality. Gaining muscle size helps you fill out your shirt sleeves or jeans…in a good way, of course.

When strength training, you will likely gain size and strength.

How to Maximize Results

Both require different approaches if you want to maximize your results in one of them.

To focus on strength, the execution of your training becomes really important:

  • Complete 2 sessions per week.
  • Using heavier amounts of resistance is key.
  • Increase the resistance often.
  • This is especially important in the major lifts, which are the leg press, row, pulldown, and chest press.
  • Increase the resistance to the point where you reach “Muscle Success” at around 50-70 seconds.

To focus on muscle growth, the amount of work becomes more important.

  • Complete 3 sessions per week.
  • Perform more reps and more exercises.
  • Use a level of resistance where you reach “Muscle Success” at around 70-100 seconds.
  • If you can tolerate it, complete 8-10 exercises per session.
  • Include exercises that directly target your areas of focus.
  • For example, if you want bigger arms, perform the biceps curl.
  • Look below for references to studies that are the sources for these recommendations.

You’re going to become stronger one achieve muscle growth if you start strength training at The Perfect Workout.

If you want to maximize your progress in one area, pay closer attention to the details of your program.

Tell your trainer what you want to achieve and they will adjust your program accordingly.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Borde, R., Hortobagyi, T., & Grandacher, U. (2015). Dose-response relationships of resistance training in older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Sports Medicine, 45, 1693-1720.
  • Schoenfeld, B.J., Contreras, B., Krieger, J., Grgic, J., Delcastillo, K., Belliard, R., & Alto, A. (2018). Resistance training volume enhances muscle hypertrophy but not strength in trained men. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.
  • Schoenfeld, B.J., Ogborn, D., & Krieger, J.W. (2017). Dose-response relationship between weekly resistance training in muscle mass: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Sports Sciences, 35(11), 1073-1082.

Training for Strength or Hypertrophy

Mission Monday Episode 7

What are your training goals?

Are you looking to get stronger? Are you looking to build muscle?

Those two goals are mentioned together so often that they seem like the same goal.
But…they are not.

They are different goals that require different training approaches.

Before we talk about training approaches, let's define each one…

Muscle Strength vs Size

Muscle strength is the greatest amount of weight that can be lifted with movement.

Strength is a functional quality. Strength is useful to you as having more strength makes the other activities in your life easier.

For example, as you gain strength, it’s easier to walk upstairs, carry bags of groceries, or move furniture.

Gaining muscle size, which is known as muscle hypertrophy, is when muscle cells become larger.

Muscle size is obviously an aesthetic quality. Gaining muscle size helps you fill out your shirt sleeves or jeans…in a good way, of course.

When strength training, you will likely gain size and strength.

How to Maximize Results

Both require different approaches if you want to maximize your results in one of them.

To focus on strength, the execution of your training becomes really important:

  • Complete 2 sessions per week.
  • Using heavier amounts of resistance is key.
  • Increase the resistance often.
  • This is especially important in the major lifts, which are the leg press, row, pulldown, and chest press.
  • Increase the resistance to the point where you reach “Muscle Success” at around 50-70 seconds.


To focus on muscle growth, the amount of work becomes more important.

  • Complete 3 sessions per week.
  • Perform more reps and more exercises.
  • Use a level of resistance where you reach “Muscle Success” at around 70-100 seconds.
  • If you can tolerate it, complete 8-10 exercises per session.
  • Include exercises that directly target your areas of focus.
  • For example, if you want bigger arms, perform the biceps curl.
  • Look below for references to studies that are the sources for these recommendations.


You’re going to become stronger one achieve muscle growth if you start strength training at The Perfect Workout.

If you want to maximize your progress in one area, pay closer attention to the details of your program.

Tell your trainer what you want to achieve and they will adjust your program accordingly.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Borde, R., Hortobagyi, T., & Grandacher, U. (2015). Dose-response relationships of resistance training in older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Sports Medicine, 45, 1693-1720.
  • Schoenfeld, B.J., Contreras, B., Krieger, J., Grgic, J., Delcastillo, K., Belliard, R., & Alto, A. (2018). Resistance training volume enhances muscle hypertrophy but not strength in trained men. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.
  • Schoenfeld, B.J., Ogborn, D., & Krieger, J.W. (2017). Dose-response relationship between weekly resistance training in muscle mass: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Sports Sciences, 35(11), 1073-1082.

One Set is All You Need

One Set is All You Need

Mission Monday Episode 5

A question that comes up often is, “why do we only perform one set per exercise?”

It’s a valid question. If one set works, wouldn’t we get better results from multiple sets on each exercise?

Performing multiple sets of each exercise is a common practice. Specifically, “3 sets per exercise” is the go-to recommendation of many fitness professionals.

Before we get in to why one set is enough, let’s talk about where the “three-set” recommendation started.

Sets & Repetitions

In the late 1940s and early 1950s, Thomas DeLorme and Dr. Arthur Watkins published a series of research papers about the use of strength training to increase muscle size.

Originally, they recommended performing 7-10 sets per exercise with 10 repetitions for each set…for a total of 70-100 repetitions. Imagine doing 70-100 repetitions of every exercise!

Within three years, DeLorme and Watkins changed their mind. The new recommendation: 2-3 sets with 20-30 total repetitions

They realized that fewer repetitions lead to “greater and more rapid” muscle growth. The three-set per exercise has been the consensus since that point.

However, DeLorme and Watkins didn’t recommend three sets of maximum effort work. They actually recommended using the first two sets as a build-up to the third one, which was an all-out effort.

As you might know, at The Perfect Workout we skip the two build-up sets and get straight to the most important set: the one where you do every rep that you possibly can.

One Set vs. Multiple Sets

A number of studies also support one set as being sufficient to get great results. Here are some of the research-proven benefits:

  • Muscle growth
  • Losing fat (when combining a single-set strength training program with calorie restriction)
  • Reducing blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood glucose
  • Improving artery function
  • And developing better aerobic fitness

Are we saying multiple sets are useless? NO. Not at all. Performing multiple sets per exercise has value for some people, including competitive athletes and bodybuilders.

Performing one set, however, provides the majority of the benefits most people seek, including fat loss, muscle growth, and better health.

What’s the best part? The single-set approach helps you get all of these benefits while being in and out of the gym in less than 30 minutes.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Cornelissen, V. A., & Fagard, R. H. (2005). Effect of resistance training on resting blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of hypertension, 23(2), 251-259.
  • Davy, B. M., Winett, R. A., Savla, J., Marinik, E. L., Baugh, M. E., Flack, K. D., … & Boshra, S. (2017). Resist diabetes: A randomized clinical trial for resistance training maintenance in adults with prediabetes. PLoS One, 12(2), e0172610.
  • DeLorme,T. & Watkins, A.L. (1948). Technics of progressive resistance training. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 29, 263-273.
  • Pratley, R., Nicklas, B., & Rubin, M. (1994). Strength training increases resting metabolic rate and norepinephrine levels in health 50- to 65-year-old men. Journal of Applied Physiology, 76(1), 133-137.
  • Waller, M., Miller, J., & Hannon, J. (2011). Resistance circuit training: Its application for the adult population. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 33(1), 16-22.
  • Watkins, A.L. (1952). Practical applications of progressive resistance exercises. JAMA, 148(6), 443-446.
  • Westcott, W.L., Apovian, C.M., & Puhala, K. Nutrition programs enhance exercise effects on body composition and resting blood pressure. The Physician and Sportsmedicine, 41(3), 85-91.

One Set is All You Need

Mission Monday Episode 5

A question that comes up often is, “why do we only perform one set per exercise?”

It’s a valid question. If one set works, wouldn’t we get better results from multiple sets on each exercise?

Performing multiple sets of each exercise is a common practice. Specifically, “3 sets per exercise” is the go-to recommendation of many fitness professionals.

Before we get in to why one set is enough, let’s talk about where the “three-set” recommendation started.

Sets & Repetitions

In the late 1940s and early 1950s, Thomas DeLorme and Dr. Arthur Watkins published a series of research papers about the use of strength training to increase muscle size.

Originally, they recommended performing 7-10 sets per exercise with 10 repetitions for each set…for a total of 70-100 repetitions. Imagine doing 70-100 repetitions of every exercise!

Within three years, DeLorme and Watkins changed their mind. The new recommendation: 2-3 sets with 20-30 total repetitions

They realized that fewer repetitions lead to “greater and more rapid” muscle growth. The three-set per exercise has been the consensus since that point.

However, DeLorme and Watkins didn’t recommend three sets of maximum effort work. They actually recommended using the first two sets as a build-up to the third one, which was an all-out effort.

As you might know, at The Perfect Workout we skip the two build-up sets and get straight to the most important set: the one where you do every rep that you possibly can.

One Set vs. Multiple Sets

A number of studies also support one set as being sufficient to get great results. Here are some of the research-proven benefits:

  • Muscle growth
  • Losing fat (when combining a single-set strength training program with calorie restriction)
  • Reducing blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood glucose
  • Improving artery function
  • And developing better aerobic fitness


Are we saying multiple sets are useless? NO. Not at all. Performing multiple sets per exercise has value for some people, including competitive athletes and bodybuilders.

Performing one set, however, provides the majority of the benefits most people seek, including fat loss, muscle growth, and better health.

What’s the best part? The single-set approach helps you get all of these benefits while being in and out of the gym in less than 30 minutes.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Cornelissen, V. A., & Fagard, R. H. (2005). Effect of resistance training on resting blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of hypertension, 23(2), 251-259.
  • Davy, B. M., Winett, R. A., Savla, J., Marinik, E. L., Baugh, M. E., Flack, K. D., … & Boshra, S. (2017). Resist diabetes: A randomized clinical trial for resistance training maintenance in adults with prediabetes. PLoS One, 12(2), e0172610.
  • DeLorme,T. & Watkins, A.L. (1948). Technics of progressive resistance training. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 29, 263-273.
  • Pratley, R., Nicklas, B., & Rubin, M. (1994). Strength training increases resting metabolic rate and norepinephrine levels in health 50- to 65-year-old men. Journal of Applied Physiology, 76(1), 133-137.
  • Waller, M., Miller, J., & Hannon, J. (2011). Resistance circuit training: Its application for the adult population. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 33(1), 16-22.
  • Watkins, A.L. (1952). Practical applications of progressive resistance exercises. JAMA, 148(6), 443-446.
  • Westcott, W.L., Apovian, C.M., & Puhala, K. Nutrition programs enhance exercise effects on body composition and resting blood pressure. The Physician and Sportsmedicine, 41(3), 85-91.

Is It Safe to Strength Train While Pregnant?

Is It Safe to Strength Train While Pregnant?

Mission Monday Episode 3

Over 60% of expectant mothers do not exercise during pregnancy.

Some of these cases are high-risk pregnancies, where extreme caution is required.

For other expectant mothers, is it safe to strength train?

Health Concerns For Strength Training While Pregnant

Physiologically, the most commonly identified concerns are potential damage to the fetus, hyperthermia, and disrupting the regular blood flow to the fetus.

Several studies show that these concerns are just that — they are ONLY concerns. Strength training does not actually cause those potential issues.

Most importantly, strength training does NOT increase the risk of a miscarriage or any negative labor side effects.

As a whole, strength training is safe for pregnant women.

It Can Actually Be Dangerous To Not Exercise During Pregnancy

Inactivity during pregnancy could lead to excess weight gain and a large loss of muscle tissue. In addition, inactivity enhances the chances of developing gestational diabetes.

Strength training can prevent all of these concerns, plus provide other benefits. Some of these benefits include:

  • Improving posture
  • Strengthening key muscles that are involved in labor
  • Having less strain during labor
  • Decreasing the chances of suffering lower back pain
  • AND…reducing the risk of preeclampsia by anywhere from 24 to 54%

Strength training is not only a good choice for the mom. Babies from strength-trained moms are generally longer and have more lean mass.

The research identified a few safety considerations for mothers going into strength training. To maximize safety, avoid holding your breath during exercise, stay away from exercises that can cause potential bone and ligament injuries — such as deadlifts and back squats — and avoid overhead lifts after the first trimester.

Follow Your Physician’s Lead

If your doctor supports strength training, go for it. The research shows that strength training during pregnancy is not only safe for the mother and the fetus, but it reduces pregnancy and labor pains, decreases the risk of common pregnancy-related health problems, and helps ensure a safe amount of weight gain

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Pujol, T. J., Barnes, J. T., Elder, C. L., & LaFontaine, T. (2007). Resistance training during pregnancy. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 29(2), 44-46.
  • Schoenfeld, B. (2011). Resistance training during pregnancy: safe and effective program design. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 33(5), 67-75.

Is It Safe to Strength Train While Pregnant?

Mission Monday Episode 3

Over 60% of expectant mothers do not exercise during pregnancy.

Some of these cases are high-risk pregnancies, where extreme caution is required.

For other expectant mothers, is it safe to strength train?

Health Concerns For Strength Training While Pregnant

Physiologically, the most commonly identified concerns are potential damage to the fetus, hyperthermia, and disrupting the regular blood flow to the fetus.

Several studies show that these concerns are just that — they are ONLY concerns. Strength training does not actually cause those potential issues.

Most importantly, strength training does NOT increase the risk of a miscarriage or any negative labor side effects.

As a whole, strength training is safe for pregnant women.

It Can Actually Be Dangerous To Not Exercise During Pregnancy

Inactivity during pregnancy could lead to excess weight gain and a large loss of muscle tissue. In addition, inactivity enhances the chances of developing gestational diabetes.

Strength training can prevent all of these concerns, plus provide other benefits. Some of these benefits include:

  • Improving posture
  • Strengthening key muscles that are involved in labor
  • Having less strain during labor
  • Decreasing the chances of suffering lower back pain
  • AND…reducing the risk of preeclampsia by anywhere from 24 to 54%


Strength training is not only a good choice for the mom. Babies from strength-trained moms are generally longer and have more lean mass.

The research identified a few safety considerations for mothers going into strength training. To maximize safety, avoid holding your breath during exercise, stay away from exercises that can cause potential bone and ligament injuries — such as deadlifts and back squats — and avoid overhead lifts after the first trimester.

Follow Your Physician’s Lead

If your doctor supports strength training, go for it. The research shows that strength training during pregnancy is not only safe for the mother and the fetus, but it reduces pregnancy and labor pains, decreases the risk of common pregnancy-related health problems, and helps ensure a safe amount of weight gain.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Pujol, T. J., Barnes, J. T., Elder, C. L., & LaFontaine, T. (2007). Resistance training during pregnancy. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 29(2), 44-46.
  • Schoenfeld, B. (2011). Resistance training during pregnancy: safe and effective program design. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 33(5), 67-75.

Exercise Equipment for Virtual Training

Exercise equipment: what you need to know

Virtual Training exercise equipment

Virtual Personal Training with our slow-motion strength training method has proven equipment is not necessary…

Results can be achieved without using an exercise machine or equipment!

Read more here about how you can get a great workout with or without equipment.

But that doesn’t mean people don’t want equipment.

We compiled a list of recommended equipment for Virtual Training Sessions and where to buy it. Shop our recommended equipment sources here.

You might be wondering…

  • What equipment do we recommend for Virtual Training?
  • Why is this equipment recommended?
  • What exercises use equipment?

We’ll cover each of those questions in this article.

What Exercise Equipment is Recommended and Why

With over 40,000 case studies and over 20 years of service, we have plenty of experience customizing workouts for unique situations. Providing the safest and most effective exercise variation is a big part of our 1-on-1 private training.

While fitness equipment isn’t necessary, there are four tried-and-true pieces of equipment that can be useful for unique situations:

  • Resistance Bands
  • Dumbbells
  • Mini-Exercise Balls
  • Exercise Benches

 

What Are Resistance Bands Used For

A better question is: What AREN’T resistance bands used for?!

Resistance bands are incredibly versatile, especially if you don’t have actual weights. They can also be used to make an exercise more or less intense.

Upright Row Resistance Bands

For instance, if you struggle with push-ups, your trainer might have you secure one end of the resistance band over the top of a door as an anchor, then loop the other end of the band over your body as you get into push-up position.

With the resistance band looped around your body, the tension from being attached to the door will cause the band to support you and make the bottom half of the push-up easier.

Or maybe push-ups are too easy for you!

If that's the case, resistance bands can also be used to make exercises more challenging. You would just grip the resistance band in both hands as you do the exercise, making sure the band is across the back of your shoulders.

The upper range of the push-up gets more challenging when you do a push-up with resistance bands like this.

Shop resistance bands here.

What Are Dumbbells Used For

Also known as hand weights, dumbbells provide more resistance when you want to make an exercise more challenging.

They range in weight and can be made out of cast iron or concrete, sometimes coated in neoprene, rubber, or a plastic casing.

Men and Women using dumbbells

Compared to an entire barbell, dumbbells are especially useful for isolating specific muscles. With a barbell or machine, you might run into a situation where you’re gripping with both hands but one side is definitely carrying most of the weight. With dumbbells, one side can’t overcompensate for the other.

Shop dumbbells here.

What Are Mini-Exercise Balls Used For

Mini-exercise balls can be easy to underestimate. “I mean, they’re just a ball, right?”

Wrong! They’re GREAT for balance and stability.

But what does that mean for your workout and your results?

It’s another way to provide structure for your form. When you focus on stabilizing an area of the body, you’re able to contract specific muscles more effectively.

More contraction = more intense.

More intense = more efficient and effective workout.

Exercise Ball

Maybe you're someone who struggles to keep your knees aligned with your toes on a wall squat. In that example, your knees might cave in or push out – causing the exercise to lose effectiveness as the muscle contraction moves to other unintended parts of the body.

Your trainer might have you put an exercise ball between your knees to help train your body to stay aligned.

This would force your knees to keep a certain position which allows you to stop worrying about what your knees are doing and just focus on squeezing your glutes and pushing through your heels.

Shop exercise balls here.

What Are Exercise Benches Used For

Similar to our favored Nautilus machines, exercise benches stabilize the body and help structure it in a way that reduces risk of injury.

“Okay, but doesn’t a chair accomplish the same thing?”

Adjustable Dumbbells and bench

With a chair, couch, bed, or table, you’d probably have to grab several pillows to get a similar angle with less stability.

You can easily adjust incline for the seat back with an exercise bench or weight bench and be confident you won’t fall over with a tower of pillows. 😉

Another perk of an exercise bench is it provides a sturdy, flat surface a little higher from the ground for those who struggle getting up and down from the floor!

Shop exercise benches here.

Just reading about the different types of equipment might make you feel inspired to try a new version of an old exercise.

Our Certified Personal Trainers know there are limitless ways to customize your workout. They’ll choose an exercise variation based on your goals and medical needs to find the safest and most effective version every time.

No matter where you are or what fitness equipment you do or don’t have, you can always get in a great workout.

Read more about what exercise variations you can do with different levels of equipment here.

Makeshift virtual training equipment

If you felt inspired to try a new exercise, or if you’ve been dying to get some trusted equipment for yourself…

Be sure to check out our recommendations today!

Exercise equipment is in high demand and availability is extremely limited, so we recommend taking a look ASAP.

Consider setting alerts on your phone or subscribing to restock notifications from the seller and check back often if you run into items being out of stock.

Shop exercise equipment here.

How to Workout Anytime, Anywhere (no excuses)

no excuses. how to workout anytime, anywhere, no matter what.

small space workouts with results

Having coached over 8,000 Virtual Training sessions in the past couple months, we are confident about what we are about to share with you…

You need very little to accomplish a workout that creates body-shaping results.

Most gyms and personal trainers over-complicate the process of working out safely and effectively by adding ropes, boxes, sandbags, all the bells and whistles to a training session when most of it is unnecessary.

This does not mean exercise is easy or easily accomplished alone, but it should be simple.

In this article we outline all you need in order to perform slow-motion strength training to muscle success inside & outside of the studio, starting with… a beach towel.

As coaches, we hear these statements all the time-

“I don’t have enough space or the right equipment to workout at home.”
“I won’t be able to workout while traveling for work or on vacation because I won’t be near a studio.”
“I can’t get into the studio today, so I’ll have to skip my workout.”

Whether you’re stuck at home in isolation, or on the road traveling in a hotel, it is ALWAYS possible to get in the perfect workout…and we’re going to show you how.

If you have room for a beach towel, a yoga mat, or the length of your body, you have enough space and equipment for a really good workout.

Yes, it’s that simple.

female client strength training on a nautilus machine with a personal trainer

Let’s get into the programs, shall we?

PROGRAM 1: The Hotel Collection

This is one of those no-excuse opportunities. If you’ve got a body and space for a beach towel, you’ve got the goods to get in a great workout.

This program is perfect for you if:

  • You have very limited workout space.
  • You have zero workout equipment or access to makeshift equipment.
  • You are traveling and plan to exercise in a hotel room

What you need to perform this program:

  • Enough space to fit the length of a beach towel or yoga mat
  • A chair
  • Beach or Bath Towel

LOWER BODY

  • Slow motion squat or wall squat
  • Leg Curl on Chair
  • Glute Bridge
female clients doing lower body exercises virtually

UPPER BODY

  • Slow motion push up on wall or ground
  • Superman with pull
  • Static Bicep Curl with Towel
female clients doing upper body exercises virtually

CORE/ABDOMINALS

  • Boat pose
  • Plank
female clients doing core and abdominal workouts virtually

Watch this Quick Video to see a REAL LIFE client performing the Superman Exercise!

PROGRAM 2: The MacGyver

Remember MacGyver?… oh come on, we know you remember MacGyver! He had that uncanny ability to craft up some magnificently effective tool with a just paperclip and a wad of gum.

This program is kind of like that– meaning you can use whatever you have lying around that house that will help to either add resistance or make the exercises more weight-bearing. We promise the workout will be surprisingly, and magnificently effective.

This program is perfect for you if:

  • You have very limited workout space.
  • You have no workout equipment, but access to household items (see below)

What you need to perform this program:

  • Enough space to fit the length of a beach towel or yoga mat
  • A chair
  • Beach Towel or Large Towel
  • Paper Towels or Socks
  • Bag of Bricks, Gallon of Detergent (or other heavy household item you can hold)

LOWER BODY

  • Squat with bag of bricks or detergent
  • Leg Curl on with paper towels
  • Static Leg Extension
  • Lunges
Virtual training clients doing lower body exercises

UPPER BODY

  • Slow motion push up on wall or ground
  • Superman with pull
  • Static Bicep Curl with Towel
  • Overhead Tricep Extension with household item
Virtual clients doing upper body workouts

CORE/ABDOMINALS

  • Time Static Crunch with Bag of Bricks
Male clients doing abdominal workouts virtually

Watch a Quick Video of REAL LIFE clients performing this abdominal exercise!

Watch a Quick Video of REAL LIFE clients performing this abdominal exercise!

Program 3: Too Legit to Quit

This is an even bigger no-excuse moment… you actually have legitimate exercise equipment! Let’s put your dumbbell sets and resistances bands to use.

This program is perfect for you if:

  • You have very limited to ample workout space.
  • You have access to basic exercise equipment such as: dumbbells, resistance bands, kettlebells

What you need to perform this program:

  • Dumbbells or kettlebells
  • Resistance band(s)
  • Chair or ottoman

LOWER BODY

  • Wall squat with dumbbells
  • Glute bridge with resistance band, or free weight
  • Lunges with dumbbells
Virtual clients and trainers doing lower body workouts

UPPER BODY

  • Slow motion push up on wall or ground
  • Chest Press with dumbbells
  • Bicep Curl with Bands or dumbbells
  • Lat Pullover with dumbbells
Virtual clients and trainers doing upper body workouts

CORE/ABDOMINALS

  • Time Static Crunch with kettlebell or dumbbell
Female vitrual client doing core exercises

Watch this Quick Video of a REAL LIFE client performing the Glute Bridge Exercise!

Program 4: Slow-Mo Studio

Getting to this program is the ultimate goal. If you can make it into The Perfect Workout studio to work 1-on-1 with a trainer in person, then we highly recommend you do it. We supply the space, the equipment, the cold water and as always… the coaching!

This program is perfect for you if:

  • You want to get stronger, leaner or improve your health in any way
  • Want access to a distraction-free environment
  • Want access to machines calibrated for slow speed and maximum resistance

What you need to perform this program:

  • An appointment at The Perfect Workout studio

LOWER BODY

  • Leg Press
  • Leg Curl
  • Hip Abduction
  • Hip Adduction
in studio personal training with machines

UPPER BODY

  • Chest Press
  • Compound Row
  • Preacher Curl
in studio personal training with machines

CORE/ABDOMINALS

  • Abdominal Machine
in studio abdominal machine training

Watch a Quick Video of a REAL LIFE Slow-Mo Studio Workout!

However, we know that everyone is working with a different set of abilities, equipment options and amount of space! So, whether you are training in one of our studios, working out virtually with our trainers, or getting in a hotel-room workout session while traveling, we’re here to give you the tools and resources to stay on track so you can reach your fitness goals.

How are we able to promise that?

The principles of exercise remain the same no matter where you workout, or what equipment to use. Before we dive into the different programs we’ve outlined below, the most important things to understand are these:

  • Always use slow-motion protocol
  • Never sacrifice safety, efficiency or effectiveness
  • Work with a Personal Trainer
female client with a female personal trainer on a machine

Sticking to slow-motion protocol:

For over 20 years, The Perfect Workout has been helping people change their bodies and their lives with a revolutionary method of exercise: slow-motion strength training.

Slow-motion strength training involves lifting weights slowly, in a controlled manner, until you can’t do another repetition.

This means that the targeted muscle group has reached momentary muscle failure– we call it muscle success. It may sound intimidating but the goal of any strength training exercise is to achieve this result.

For a detailed explanation of our method, see our article on High Intensity Exercise.

In short, slow-motion strength training is a workout that is short, brief & intense, and requires ample recovery which ultimately creates more positive effects on the body than any other exercise method.

3 Pillars of Exercise: Safety, Efficiency & Effectiveness

Safety is key when performing any exercise. There is no lift, press or pull important enough or worth doing incorrectly that might risk injury. This is where the attention of your Personal Trainer is needed. Even the most seasoned athletes need a coach, someone who can help them see what they aren’t able to and guide them to the goal… especially when muscle success is approaching.

Speaking of muscle success, achieving that ultimate goal of exercise with slow speed and no momentum makes each exercise efficient and effective. A good rule of thumb is to attain the goal in between 1-2 minutes.

female client with male personal trainer in studio

The Value of a Coach

Our Personal Trainers offer more than just a workout. You can expect to get personalized attention, guidance on how to do each exercise, adaptations to the workout depending on your ability, equipment and desired intensity level, accountability, expert coaching, and a friend throughout your fitness journey.

Reminder: Please work 1-on-1 with a Personal Trainer on any of the below programs to ensure you are achieving an ideal workout without sacrificing any of our musts: safety, efficiency & effectiveness!

Below you’ll find four different workout programs that vary depending on the amount of space and equipment you have access to. Why did we put these together?

  • To always keep you on track toward reaching your goals!
  • To ensure you are always building strength and not losing it!
  • To offer you coaching and support no matter what the obstacle is!
  • To prioritize your health above all!

Life will always throw us curve balls that can disrupt our routines and take us off track. We want to give you everything you need in order to maintain your workouts, your momentum and your progress.

The last thing we want you to know is this- There are advantages to working out with machines, but there are more disadvantages to not working out at all.

Using machines, like our Nautilus equipment in the studios have the potential to be safer than free weights because they allow for better concentration which can facilitate a higher intensity level. In addition, many machines provide resistance throughout each repetition's entire range of motion.

So, if you have the option of training in one of our Personal Training studios, that would be an ideal option. If you cannot, whether you are sheltering at home, traveling, or simply don’t live close to our studios… well, we’ve given you a no-excuses approach to getting in your exercise. ?

There are more disadvantages to not working out at all, including:

  • Gaining Fat
  • Losing Muscle
  • Losing Bone Density
  • Decreased Energy & Stamina
  • Increased Mobility Issues
  • Increased Blood Pressure
  • Increased Cholesterol Levels

And so much more!

So.. no workout space? No equipment? NO PROBLEM!

virtual personal trainer with client

SUMMARY

You need very little space or equipment to accomplish a workout that creates body-shaping results.

What you do need is:

To utilize Slow-motion strength training Protocol, taking each repetition to muscle success using slow speeds and optimal resistance when available.

Always practice safety, efficiency and effectiveness when exercising and use those as pillars to guide what types of exercises to do, how to do them and how much resistance to add.

Whenever possible, exercise with the guidance of a Personal Trainer who can coach you to muscle success, choose exercises for you, how much resistance to work with and ensure you are getting in the most effective workout possible.

Remember, you can get in a great workout whether you are just working with the weight of your body and a beach towel or you have full access to our training studios with Nautilus equipment. The magic lies within the method and the coach!

Already working with one of our Personal Trainers? Fantastic!

Not working out right now? Schedule a Virtual Training Session to keep you active at home!

Pin It on Pinterest