Training for Strength or Hypertrophy

Training for Strength or Hypertrophy

Mission Monday Episode 7

What are your training goals?

Are you looking to get stronger? Are you looking to build muscle?

Those two goals are mentioned together so often that they seem like the same goal.
But…they are not.

They are different goals that require different training approaches.

Before we talk about training approaches, let's define each one…

Muscle Strength vs Size

Muscle strength is the greatest amount of weight that can be lifted with movement.

Strength is a functional quality. Strength is useful to you as having more strength makes the other activities in your life easier.

For example, as you gain strength, it’s easier to walk upstairs, carry bags of groceries, or move furniture.

Gaining muscle size, which is known as muscle hypertrophy, is when muscle cells become larger.

Muscle size is obviously an aesthetic quality. Gaining muscle size helps you fill out your shirt sleeves or jeans…in a good way, of course.

When strength training, you will likely gain size and strength.

How to Maximize Results

Both require different approaches if you want to maximize your results in one of them.

To focus on strength, the execution of your training becomes really important:

  • Complete 2 sessions per week.
  • Using heavier amounts of resistance is key.
  • Increase the resistance often.
  • This is especially important in the major lifts, which are the leg press, row, pulldown, and chest press.
  • Increase the resistance to the point where you reach “Muscle Success” at around 50-70 seconds.

To focus on muscle growth, the amount of work becomes more important.

  • Complete 3 sessions per week.
  • Perform more reps and more exercises.
  • Use a level of resistance where you reach “Muscle Success” at around 70-100 seconds.
  • If you can tolerate it, complete 8-10 exercises per session.
  • Include exercises that directly target your areas of focus.
  • For example, if you want bigger arms, perform the biceps curl.
  • Look below for references to studies that are the sources for these recommendations.

You’re going to become stronger one achieve muscle growth if you start strength training at The Perfect Workout.

If you want to maximize your progress in one area, pay closer attention to the details of your program.

Tell your trainer what you want to achieve and they will adjust your program accordingly.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Borde, R., Hortobagyi, T., & Grandacher, U. (2015). Dose-response relationships of resistance training in older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Sports Medicine, 45, 1693-1720.
  • Schoenfeld, B.J., Contreras, B., Krieger, J., Grgic, J., Delcastillo, K., Belliard, R., & Alto, A. (2018). Resistance training volume enhances muscle hypertrophy but not strength in trained men. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.
  • Schoenfeld, B.J., Ogborn, D., & Krieger, J.W. (2017). Dose-response relationship between weekly resistance training in muscle mass: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Sports Sciences, 35(11), 1073-1082.

Training for Strength or Hypertrophy

Mission Monday Episode 7

What are your training goals?

Are you looking to get stronger? Are you looking to build muscle?

Those two goals are mentioned together so often that they seem like the same goal.
But…they are not.

They are different goals that require different training approaches.

Before we talk about training approaches, let's define each one…

Muscle Strength vs Size

Muscle strength is the greatest amount of weight that can be lifted with movement.

Strength is a functional quality. Strength is useful to you as having more strength makes the other activities in your life easier.

For example, as you gain strength, it’s easier to walk upstairs, carry bags of groceries, or move furniture.

Gaining muscle size, which is known as muscle hypertrophy, is when muscle cells become larger.

Muscle size is obviously an aesthetic quality. Gaining muscle size helps you fill out your shirt sleeves or jeans…in a good way, of course.

When strength training, you will likely gain size and strength.

How to Maximize Results

Both require different approaches if you want to maximize your results in one of them.

To focus on strength, the execution of your training becomes really important:

  • Complete 2 sessions per week.
  • Using heavier amounts of resistance is key.
  • Increase the resistance often.
  • This is especially important in the major lifts, which are the leg press, row, pulldown, and chest press.
  • Increase the resistance to the point where you reach “Muscle Success” at around 50-70 seconds.


To focus on muscle growth, the amount of work becomes more important.

  • Complete 3 sessions per week.
  • Perform more reps and more exercises.
  • Use a level of resistance where you reach “Muscle Success” at around 70-100 seconds.
  • If you can tolerate it, complete 8-10 exercises per session.
  • Include exercises that directly target your areas of focus.
  • For example, if you want bigger arms, perform the biceps curl.
  • Look below for references to studies that are the sources for these recommendations.


You’re going to become stronger one achieve muscle growth if you start strength training at The Perfect Workout.

If you want to maximize your progress in one area, pay closer attention to the details of your program.

Tell your trainer what you want to achieve and they will adjust your program accordingly.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Borde, R., Hortobagyi, T., & Grandacher, U. (2015). Dose-response relationships of resistance training in older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Sports Medicine, 45, 1693-1720.
  • Schoenfeld, B.J., Contreras, B., Krieger, J., Grgic, J., Delcastillo, K., Belliard, R., & Alto, A. (2018). Resistance training volume enhances muscle hypertrophy but not strength in trained men. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.
  • Schoenfeld, B.J., Ogborn, D., & Krieger, J.W. (2017). Dose-response relationship between weekly resistance training in muscle mass: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Sports Sciences, 35(11), 1073-1082.

Myokines

Myokines

Mission Monday Episode 5

We know strength training is healthy for us. In fact, strength training is so beneficial that just a single workout can make you healthier

But how does strength training make us healthier? What happens inside our body during and after a workout that leads to better health?

Before answering those questions, let’s talk about how the human body operates.

The inner workings of the human body are similar to how we operate in the world. Much of what we do is the result of a message sent from a messenger

For example, a friend or coworker may send an email, phone call, or text with a request that leads us to work on a project or drive to a friend’s house. In our body, messages are sent that cause cells to act in specific ways.

One example of this is the pancreas producing hormones that will stimulate an increase or decrease in blood sugar.

What are Myokines?

Another messenger in our body is myokines.

Myokines are small proteins that come from our muscles and stimulate cells to take specific actions. Myokines specifically target other muscle cells, fat cells, and cells in several of the most critical organs in our body.

When they are produced, myokines promote healthy bodily functioning. Creating myokines can lead to:

Our health improves when we create more myokines.

Myokines are created when our muscles contract. As you may guess, strength training is an excellent way — maybe the most effective way — to maximize the production of myokines.

Research shows that strength training enhances the production of key myokines that reduce the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and dementia.

In summary, myokines come from muscle contractions and they stimulate healthy changes in the body.

Strength training is a very effective strategy for increasing the production of myokines and, therefore, for improving your health.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Benatti, F.B. & Pedersen, B.K. (2015). Exercise as an anti-inflammatory therapy for rheumatic diseases–myokine regulation. Nature Reviews Rheumatology, 11, 86-97.
  • He, Z., Tian, Y., Valenzuela, P.L., Huang, C., Zhao, J., Hong, P., … Lucia, A. (2018). Myokine response to high-intensity interval vs. resistance exercise: an individual approach. Frontiers in Physiology, 9, 1735.
  • Lee, J.H. & Jun, H.S. (2019). Role of myokines in regulating skeletal muscle mass and function. Frontiers in Physiology.

Myokines

Mission Monday Episode 5

We know strength training is healthy for us. In fact, strength training is so beneficial that just a single workout can make you healthier

But how does strength training make us healthier? What happens inside our body during and after a workout that leads to better health?

Before answering those questions, let’s talk about how the human body operates.

The inner workings of the human body are similar to how we operate in the world. Much of what we do is the result of a message sent from a messenger

For example, a friend or coworker may send an email, phone call, or text with a request that leads us to work on a project or drive to a friend’s house. In our body, messages are sent that cause cells to act in specific ways.

One example of this is the pancreas producing hormones that will stimulate an increase or decrease in blood sugar.

What are Myokines?

Another messenger in our body is myokines.

Myokines are small proteins that come from our muscles and stimulate cells to take specific actions. Myokines specifically target other muscle cells, fat cells, and cells in several of the most critical organs in our body.

When they are produced, myokines promote healthy bodily functioning. Creating myokines can lead to:

Our health improves when we create more myokines.

Myokines are created when our muscles contract. As you may guess, strength training is an excellent way — maybe the most effective way — to maximize the production of myokines.

Research shows that strength training enhances the production of key myokines that reduce the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and dementia.

In summary, myokines come from muscle contractions and they stimulate healthy changes in the body.

Strength training is a very effective strategy for increasing the production of myokines and, therefore, for improving your health.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Benatti, F.B. & Pedersen, B.K. (2015). Exercise as an anti-inflammatory therapy for rheumatic diseases–myokine regulation. Nature Reviews Rheumatology, 11, 86-97.
  • He, Z., Tian, Y., Valenzuela, P.L., Huang, C., Zhao, J., Hong, P., … Lucia, A. (2018). Myokine response to high-intensity interval vs. resistance exercise: an individual approach. Frontiers in Physiology, 9, 1735.
  • Lee, J.H. & Jun, H.S. (2019). Role of myokines in regulating skeletal muscle mass and function. Frontiers in Physiology.

One Set is All You Need

One Set is All You Need

Mission Monday Episode 5

A question that comes up often is, “why do we only perform one set per exercise?”

It’s a valid question. If one set works, wouldn’t we get better results from multiple sets on each exercise?

Performing multiple sets of each exercise is a common practice. Specifically, “3 sets per exercise” is the go-to recommendation of many fitness professionals.

Before we get in to why one set is enough, let’s talk about where the “three-set” recommendation started.

Sets & Repetitions

In the late 1940s and early 1950s, Thomas DeLorme and Dr. Arthur Watkins published a series of research papers about the use of strength training to increase muscle size.

Originally, they recommended performing 7-10 sets per exercise with 10 repetitions for each set…for a total of 70-100 repetitions. Imagine doing 70-100 repetitions of every exercise!

Within three years, DeLorme and Watkins changed their mind. The new recommendation: 2-3 sets with 20-30 total repetitions

They realized that fewer repetitions lead to “greater and more rapid” muscle growth. The three-set per exercise has been the consensus since that point.

However, DeLorme and Watkins didn’t recommend three sets of maximum effort work. They actually recommended using the first two sets as a build-up to the third one, which was an all-out effort.

As you might know, at The Perfect Workout we skip the two build-up sets and get straight to the most important set: the one where you do every rep that you possibly can.

One Set vs. Multiple Sets

A number of studies also support one set as being sufficient to get great results. Here are some of the research-proven benefits:

  • Muscle growth
  • Losing fat (when combining a single-set strength training program with calorie restriction)
  • Reducing blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood glucose
  • Improving artery function
  • And developing better aerobic fitness

Are we saying multiple sets are useless? NO. Not at all. Performing multiple sets per exercise has value for some people, including competitive athletes and bodybuilders.

Performing one set, however, provides the majority of the benefits most people seek, including fat loss, muscle growth, and better health.

What’s the best part? The single-set approach helps you get all of these benefits while being in and out of the gym in less than 30 minutes.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Cornelissen, V. A., & Fagard, R. H. (2005). Effect of resistance training on resting blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of hypertension, 23(2), 251-259.
  • Davy, B. M., Winett, R. A., Savla, J., Marinik, E. L., Baugh, M. E., Flack, K. D., … & Boshra, S. (2017). Resist diabetes: A randomized clinical trial for resistance training maintenance in adults with prediabetes. PLoS One, 12(2), e0172610.
  • DeLorme,T. & Watkins, A.L. (1948). Technics of progressive resistance training. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 29, 263-273.
  • Pratley, R., Nicklas, B., & Rubin, M. (1994). Strength training increases resting metabolic rate and norepinephrine levels in health 50- to 65-year-old men. Journal of Applied Physiology, 76(1), 133-137.
  • Waller, M., Miller, J., & Hannon, J. (2011). Resistance circuit training: Its application for the adult population. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 33(1), 16-22.
  • Watkins, A.L. (1952). Practical applications of progressive resistance exercises. JAMA, 148(6), 443-446.
  • Westcott, W.L., Apovian, C.M., & Puhala, K. Nutrition programs enhance exercise effects on body composition and resting blood pressure. The Physician and Sportsmedicine, 41(3), 85-91.

One Set is All You Need

Mission Monday Episode 5

A question that comes up often is, “why do we only perform one set per exercise?”

It’s a valid question. If one set works, wouldn’t we get better results from multiple sets on each exercise?

Performing multiple sets of each exercise is a common practice. Specifically, “3 sets per exercise” is the go-to recommendation of many fitness professionals.

Before we get in to why one set is enough, let’s talk about where the “three-set” recommendation started.

Sets & Repetitions

In the late 1940s and early 1950s, Thomas DeLorme and Dr. Arthur Watkins published a series of research papers about the use of strength training to increase muscle size.

Originally, they recommended performing 7-10 sets per exercise with 10 repetitions for each set…for a total of 70-100 repetitions. Imagine doing 70-100 repetitions of every exercise!

Within three years, DeLorme and Watkins changed their mind. The new recommendation: 2-3 sets with 20-30 total repetitions

They realized that fewer repetitions lead to “greater and more rapid” muscle growth. The three-set per exercise has been the consensus since that point.

However, DeLorme and Watkins didn’t recommend three sets of maximum effort work. They actually recommended using the first two sets as a build-up to the third one, which was an all-out effort.

As you might know, at The Perfect Workout we skip the two build-up sets and get straight to the most important set: the one where you do every rep that you possibly can.

One Set vs. Multiple Sets

A number of studies also support one set as being sufficient to get great results. Here are some of the research-proven benefits:

  • Muscle growth
  • Losing fat (when combining a single-set strength training program with calorie restriction)
  • Reducing blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood glucose
  • Improving artery function
  • And developing better aerobic fitness


Are we saying multiple sets are useless? NO. Not at all. Performing multiple sets per exercise has value for some people, including competitive athletes and bodybuilders.

Performing one set, however, provides the majority of the benefits most people seek, including fat loss, muscle growth, and better health.

What’s the best part? The single-set approach helps you get all of these benefits while being in and out of the gym in less than 30 minutes.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Cornelissen, V. A., & Fagard, R. H. (2005). Effect of resistance training on resting blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of hypertension, 23(2), 251-259.
  • Davy, B. M., Winett, R. A., Savla, J., Marinik, E. L., Baugh, M. E., Flack, K. D., … & Boshra, S. (2017). Resist diabetes: A randomized clinical trial for resistance training maintenance in adults with prediabetes. PLoS One, 12(2), e0172610.
  • DeLorme,T. & Watkins, A.L. (1948). Technics of progressive resistance training. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 29, 263-273.
  • Pratley, R., Nicklas, B., & Rubin, M. (1994). Strength training increases resting metabolic rate and norepinephrine levels in health 50- to 65-year-old men. Journal of Applied Physiology, 76(1), 133-137.
  • Waller, M., Miller, J., & Hannon, J. (2011). Resistance circuit training: Its application for the adult population. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 33(1), 16-22.
  • Watkins, A.L. (1952). Practical applications of progressive resistance exercises. JAMA, 148(6), 443-446.
  • Westcott, W.L., Apovian, C.M., & Puhala, K. Nutrition programs enhance exercise effects on body composition and resting blood pressure. The Physician and Sportsmedicine, 41(3), 85-91.

Protein, A Key for Muscle Growth

Protein, A Key for Muscle Growth

Mission Monday Episode 4

Imagine trying to build a brick wall with a lack of bricks.

No matter how hard the bricklayer works, a brick wall can’t be built with a shortage of bricks

No matter how hard you work during your strength training workouts, you can’t build muscle with a shortage of protein.

Unfortunately, protein consumption is one of the biggest shortcomings people have when engaged in a fitness program.

This is a problem not just for gaining muscle but for several other reasons.

High Protein Intake

A high-protein intake is helpful for several reasons. A higher protein intake:

  • Reduces hunger levels and snack cravings
  • Decreases the risk of developing osteoporosis
  • Helps sustain weight loss
  • And, for older adults, a higher protein diet is connected with maintaining functional abilities, strength, muscle, and recovering quicker from hospitalizations

In summary, a high-protein diet is helpful for maximizing your physique, health, and physical function

How Much Protein Is Enough?

Research shows that a person should eat a daily amount of protein grams that is around their weight (in lbs) x 0.7.

Again, a daily intake of protein grams should be your weight (in lbs) x 0.7. For example:

  • For a 100 lb person x 0.7 = 70 grams of protein per day
  • For a 150 lb person, this is 105 grams per day
  • For a 200 lb person, this is 140 grams per day
  • For a 250 lb person, this is 175 grams per day

How To Get Enough Protein

How can you reach the amount that’s recommended for a person of your weight? Consume a major source of protein at every meal.

Examples of high-protein foods include fish, poultry, red meat, low-fat Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, and tofu.

If looking for a protein supplement, consider whey, casein, egg, or pea protein. These supplements have high levels of most or all amino acids and are largely digestible.

Maximize your results by complementing your strength training program with a sufficient amount of protein intake each day.

Eating enough protein will ensure that you are gaining muscle, strength, managing your weight, and maintaining your physical function.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Anderson, G.H. & Moore, S.E. (2004). Dietary proteins in the regulation of food intake and body weight in humans. The Journal of Nutrition, 134(4), 974S-979S.
  • Graham, J. (2019). Why older adults should eat more protein (and not overdo protein shakes). KHN. Retrieved from https://khn.org/news/why-older-adults-should-eat-more-protein-and-not-overdo-protein-shakes/
  • Phillips, S.M. (2012). Dietary protein requirements and adaptive advantages in athletes. British Journal of Nutrition, 108, S158-S167.

Protein, A Key for Muscle Growth

Mission Monday Episode 4

Imagine trying to build a brick wall with a lack of bricks.

No matter how hard the bricklayer works, a brick wall can’t be built with a shortage of bricks

No matter how hard you work during your strength training workouts, you can’t build muscle with a shortage of protein.

Unfortunately, protein consumption is one of the biggest shortcomings people have when engaged in a fitness program.

This is a problem not just for gaining muscle but for several other reasons.

High Protein Intake

A high-protein intake is helpful for several reasons. A higher protein intake:

  • Reduces hunger levels and snack cravings
  • Decreases the risk of developing osteoporosis
  • Helps sustain weight loss
  • And, for older adults, a higher protein diet is connected with maintaining functional abilities, strength, muscle, and recovering quicker from hospitalizations

In summary, a high-protein diet is helpful for maximizing your physique, health, and physical function

How Much Protein Is Enough?

Research shows that a person should eat a daily amount of protein grams that is around their weight (in lbs) x 0.7.

Again, a daily intake of protein grams should be your weight (in lbs) x 0.7. For example:

  • For a 100 lb person x 0.7 = 70 grams of protein per day
  • For a 150 lb person, this is 105 grams per day
  • For a 200 lb person, this is 140 grams per day
  • For a 250 lb person, this is 175 grams per day

How To Get Enough Protein

How can you reach the amount that’s recommended for a person of your weight? Consume a major source of protein at every meal.

Examples of high-protein foods include fish, poultry, red meat, low-fat Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, and tofu.

If looking for a protein supplement, consider whey, casein, egg, or pea protein. These supplements have high levels of most or all amino acids and are largely digestible.

Maximize your results by complementing your strength training program with a sufficient amount of protein intake each day.

Eating enough protein will ensure that you are gaining muscle, strength, managing your weight, and maintaining your physical function.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Anderson, G.H. & Moore, S.E. (2004). Dietary proteins in the regulation of food intake and body weight in humans. The Journal of Nutrition, 134(4), 974S-979S.
  • Graham, J. (2019). Why older adults should eat more protein (and not overdo protein shakes). KHN. Retrieved from https://khn.org/news/why-older-adults-should-eat-more-protein-and-not-overdo-protein-shakes/
  • Phillips, S.M. (2012). Dietary protein requirements and adaptive advantages in athletes. British Journal of Nutrition, 108, S158-S167.

Is It Safe to Strength Train While Pregnant?

Is It Safe to Strength Train While Pregnant?

Mission Monday Episode 3

Over 60% of expectant mothers do not exercise during pregnancy.

Some of these cases are high-risk pregnancies, where extreme caution is required.

For other expectant mothers, is it safe to strength train?

Health Concerns For Strength Training While Pregnant

Physiologically, the most commonly identified concerns are potential damage to the fetus, hyperthermia, and disrupting the regular blood flow to the fetus.

Several studies show that these concerns are just that — they are ONLY concerns. Strength training does not actually cause those potential issues.

Most importantly, strength training does NOT increase the risk of a miscarriage or any negative labor side effects.

As a whole, strength training is safe for pregnant women.

It Can Actually Be Dangerous To Not Exercise During Pregnancy

Inactivity during pregnancy could lead to excess weight gain and a large loss of muscle tissue. In addition, inactivity enhances the chances of developing gestational diabetes.

Strength training can prevent all of these concerns, plus provide other benefits. Some of these benefits include:

  • Improving posture
  • Strengthening key muscles that are involved in labor
  • Having less strain during labor
  • Decreasing the chances of suffering lower back pain
  • AND…reducing the risk of preeclampsia by anywhere from 24 to 54%

Strength training is not only a good choice for the mom. Babies from strength-trained moms are generally longer and have more lean mass.

The research identified a few safety considerations for mothers going into strength training. To maximize safety, avoid holding your breath during exercise, stay away from exercises that can cause potential bone and ligament injuries — such as deadlifts and back squats — and avoid overhead lifts after the first trimester.

Follow Your Physician’s Lead

If your doctor supports strength training, go for it. The research shows that strength training during pregnancy is not only safe for the mother and the fetus, but it reduces pregnancy and labor pains, decreases the risk of common pregnancy-related health problems, and helps ensure a safe amount of weight gain

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Pujol, T. J., Barnes, J. T., Elder, C. L., & LaFontaine, T. (2007). Resistance training during pregnancy. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 29(2), 44-46.
  • Schoenfeld, B. (2011). Resistance training during pregnancy: safe and effective program design. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 33(5), 67-75.

Is It Safe to Strength Train While Pregnant?

Mission Monday Episode 3

Over 60% of expectant mothers do not exercise during pregnancy.

Some of these cases are high-risk pregnancies, where extreme caution is required.

For other expectant mothers, is it safe to strength train?

Health Concerns For Strength Training While Pregnant

Physiologically, the most commonly identified concerns are potential damage to the fetus, hyperthermia, and disrupting the regular blood flow to the fetus.

Several studies show that these concerns are just that — they are ONLY concerns. Strength training does not actually cause those potential issues.

Most importantly, strength training does NOT increase the risk of a miscarriage or any negative labor side effects.

As a whole, strength training is safe for pregnant women.

It Can Actually Be Dangerous To Not Exercise During Pregnancy

Inactivity during pregnancy could lead to excess weight gain and a large loss of muscle tissue. In addition, inactivity enhances the chances of developing gestational diabetes.

Strength training can prevent all of these concerns, plus provide other benefits. Some of these benefits include:

  • Improving posture
  • Strengthening key muscles that are involved in labor
  • Having less strain during labor
  • Decreasing the chances of suffering lower back pain
  • AND…reducing the risk of preeclampsia by anywhere from 24 to 54%


Strength training is not only a good choice for the mom. Babies from strength-trained moms are generally longer and have more lean mass.

The research identified a few safety considerations for mothers going into strength training. To maximize safety, avoid holding your breath during exercise, stay away from exercises that can cause potential bone and ligament injuries — such as deadlifts and back squats — and avoid overhead lifts after the first trimester.

Follow Your Physician’s Lead

If your doctor supports strength training, go for it. The research shows that strength training during pregnancy is not only safe for the mother and the fetus, but it reduces pregnancy and labor pains, decreases the risk of common pregnancy-related health problems, and helps ensure a safe amount of weight gain.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Pujol, T. J., Barnes, J. T., Elder, C. L., & LaFontaine, T. (2007). Resistance training during pregnancy. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 29(2), 44-46.
  • Schoenfeld, B. (2011). Resistance training during pregnancy: safe and effective program design. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 33(5), 67-75.

The Safety of Slow Motion Strength Training

The Safety of Slow Motion Strength Training

Mission Monday Episode 2

Does the risk of a potential injury make you hesitant to exercise? If your answer is “Yes,” this video is for you.

Slow-motion strength training, especially at The Perfect Workout, is EXTREMELY safe. Keep reading to learn why…

Why Exercise Injuries Happen

An Australian research team studied injuries that took place in fitness facilities over a 14 year period. They identified nearly 3,000 injuries during that time.

Here’s the story behind those injuries:

  • 55% of injuries took place during free weight exercises
  • The rest of the injuries mainly occurred during group exercise classes, while using the treadmill, boxing, or during a jumping exercise

All of these activities have something in common: they are NOT a part of slow-motion strength training. Slow training omits these higher-risk activities.

To understand another reason why it’s so safe, let’s go back to high school physics. Injuries commonly occur during exercise when an excess of force is placed on bones, tendons, and ligaments.

When the force during an exercise is more than these different structures can handle, it can lead to a fracture, tear, strain, or sprain.

What is Force?

Newton’s Second Law of Motion states that Force is equal to Mass x Acceleration. This means, if the force of an exercise is too great, that’s because it has an excess of mass or acceleration. Slow-motion strength training limits force by limiting the acceleration.

As you perform an exercise, you are moving at a constant speed — there’s no rapid acceleration at any point. As a result, only a safe amount of force is placed on the bones and connective tissues.

There’s one more reason why slow-motion strength training is so safe. The slow speed enables your personal trainer to have more time to correct form errors. With a slow repetition, a trainer can catch and correct a form error within the same repetition.

Slow-Motion Strength Training is Safe

As a whole, slow-motion training excludes the activities that cause exercise-related injuries, limits the force placed on joints, and provides plenty of time for the trainer to correct form errors.

Slow-motion strength training is an extremely safe and effective way to improve your health, physique, and physical abilities.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Gray, S.E. & Finch, C.F. (2015). The causes of injuries sustained at fitness facilities presenting to Victorian emergency departments – identifying the main culprits. Injury Epidemiology, 2(1), 6.

The Safety of Slow Motion Strength Training

Mission Monday Episode 2

Does the risk of a potential injury make you hesitant to exercise? If your answer is “Yes,” this video is for you.

Slow-motion strength training, especially at The Perfect Workout, is EXTREMELY safe. Keep reading to learn why…

Why Exercise Injuries Happen

An Australian research team studied injuries that took place in fitness facilities over a 14 year period. They identified nearly 3,000 injuries during that time.

Here’s the story behind those injuries:

  • 55% of injuries took place during free weight exercises
  • The rest of the injuries mainly occurred during group exercise classes, while using the treadmill, boxing, or during a jumping exercise

All of these activities have something in common: they are NOT a part of slow-motion strength training. Slow training omits these higher-risk activities.

To understand another reason why it’s so safe, let’s go back to high school physics. Injuries commonly occur during exercise when an excess of force is placed on bones, tendons, and ligaments.

When the force during an exercise is more than these different structures can handle, it can lead to a fracture, tear, strain, or sprain.

What is Force?

Newton’s Second Law of Motion states that Force is equal to Mass x Acceleration. This means, if the force of an exercise is too great, that’s because it has an excess of mass or acceleration. Slow-motion strength training limits force by limiting the acceleration.

As you perform an exercise, you are moving at a constant speed — there’s no rapid acceleration at any point. As a result, only a safe amount of force is placed on the bones and connective tissues.

There’s one more reason why slow-motion strength training is so safe. The slow speed enables your personal trainer to have more time to correct form errors. With a slow repetition, a trainer can catch and correct a form error within the same repetition.

Slow-Motion Strength Training is Safe

As a whole, slow-motion training excludes the activities that cause exercise-related injuries, limits the force placed on joints, and provides plenty of time for the trainer to correct form errors.

Slow-motion strength training is an extremely safe and effective way to improve your health, physique, and physical abilities.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Gray, S.E. & Finch, C.F. (2015). The causes of injuries sustained at fitness facilities presenting to Victorian emergency departments – identifying the main culprits. Injury Epidemiology, 2(1), 6.

HIT vs All Other Methods

HIT vs. All Other Methods

Mission Monday Episode 1

The Perfect Workout’s mission is to revolutionize the way people exercise.

There are many reasons for why we do what we do, and how that approach is with your best interest in mind.

But first, we have a question...

If you are currently a part of The Perfect Workout family, exercising at one of our facilities, were you regularly exercising before starting with us? For those of you who don’t work out at The Perfect Workout — do YOU regularly exercise? The chances are that most people watching this will say “no.”

The US Department of Health and Human Services recommends exercising for 150 minutes per week, including two strength training workouts.  However, ONLY 20.6% of the population — about one in every five people — actually reach that goal on a consistent basis.

The vast majority of people don’t exercise

Regardless of the type of exercise you participate in, if you don’t do it consistently, you won’t reach your health and fitness goals.

Why don’t people stick to exercise?

The most commonly-cited reasons include a lack of time, convenience, and social support. What makes our approach so unique is that it provides all the health and fitness benefits people typically seek while solving for the common exercise barriers.

The Perfect Workout provides the results you’re seeking while not requiring a substantial amount of time. Just two 20-minute workouts per week is all the time you’ll need for exercise.

Also, the training is convenient. We write the workout, setup the equipment, and coach you through. All you need to do is show up and give your best effort. Finally, you’ll receive the support necessary to stick with the program, with every session being guided by your trainer.

You’ll have a guide there to help motivate and educate you along the way.

Speaking of results, most importantly, we do what we do because IT WORKS.

Studies that used similar approaches showed improvements in many health and fitness outcomes, such as strength, muscle growth, fat loss, overall health, artery function, blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol levels, and confidence.

We have endless testimonies from clients who achieved their goals.

Minimal time, convenience, support, and great results.

The Perfect Workout provides an approach that works AND that you can stick with.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Harris, C.D., Watson, K.B., Carlson, S.A., Fulton, J.E., & Dorn, J.M. (2011). Adult participation in aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activities — United States, 2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 62(17), 326-330.  
  • Kinnafick, F.E., Ntoumani, C.T., & Duda, J.L. (2014). Physical activity adoption to adherence, lapse, and dropout: a self-determination theory perspective. Qualitative Health Research, 1-13.  
  • Larson, H.K., McFadden, K., McHugh, T.F., Berry, T.R., & Rodgers, W.M. (2018). When you don’t get what you want–and it’s really hard: exploring motivational contributions to exercise dropout. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 37, 59-66. 
  • Physical Activity Guidelines Committee. (2018). Physical activity guidelines advisory committee scientific report. US Department of Health and Human Services.
  • Preuss, S.R. (2020). Work-It Circuit: Improving Health, Fitness, and Self-Efficacy through a Worksite Exercise Program (Doctoral dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro).

HIT vs. All Other Methods

Mission Monday Episode 1

The Perfect Workout’s mission is to revolutionize the way people exercise.

There are many reasons for why we do what we do, and how that approach is with your best interest in mind.

But first, we have a question...

If you are currently a part of The Perfect Workout family, exercising at one of our facilities, were you regularly exercising before starting with us? For those of you who don’t work out at The Perfect Workout — do YOU regularly exercise? The chances are that most people watching this will say “no.”

The US Department of Health and Human Services recommends exercising for 150 minutes per week, including two strength training workouts.  However, ONLY 20.6% of the population — about one in every five people — actually reach that goal on a consistent basis.

The vast majority of people don’t exercise

Regardless of the type of exercise you participate in, if you don’t do it consistently, you won’t reach your health and fitness goals.

Why don’t people stick to exercise?

The most commonly-cited reasons include a lack of time, convenience, and social support. What makes our approach so unique is that it provides all the health and fitness benefits people typically seek while solving for the common exercise barriers.

The Perfect Workout provides the results you’re seeking while not requiring a substantial amount of time. Just two 20-minute workouts per week is all the time you’ll need for exercise.

Also, the training is convenient. We write the workout, setup the equipment, and coach you through. All you need to do is show up and give your best effort. Finally, you’ll receive the support necessary to stick with the program, with every session being guided by your trainer.

You’ll have a guide there to help motivate and educate you along the way.

Speaking of results, most importantly, we do what we do because IT WORKS.

Studies that used similar approaches showed improvements in many health and fitness outcomes, such as strength, muscle growth, fat loss, overall health, artery function, blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol levels, and confidence.

We have endless testimonies from clients who achieved their goals.

Minimal time, convenience, support, and great results.

The Perfect Workout provides an approach that works AND that you can stick with.

If you would like to learn more about our method of strength training, read about our methodology. If you are new to The Perfect Workout, try a workout with us and start with a FREE Introductory Session.

  • Harris, C.D., Watson, K.B., Carlson, S.A., Fulton, J.E., & Dorn, J.M. (2011). Adult participation in aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activities — United States, 2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 62(17), 326-330.  
  • Kinnafick, F.E., Ntoumani, C.T., & Duda, J.L. (2014). Physical activity adoption to adherence, lapse, and dropout: a self-determination theory perspective. Qualitative Health Research, 1-13.  
  • Larson, H.K., McFadden, K., McHugh, T.F., Berry, T.R., & Rodgers, W.M. (2018). When you don’t get what you want–and it’s really hard: exploring motivational contributions to exercise dropout. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 37, 59-66. 
  • Physical Activity Guidelines Committee. (2018). Physical activity guidelines advisory committee scientific report. US Department of Health and Human Services.
  • Preuss, S.R. (2020). Work-It Circuit: Improving Health, Fitness, and Self-Efficacy through a Worksite Exercise Program (Doctoral dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro).